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Category: popular girls names



28 Gorgeous Girls’ Names We Love

baby girl names

By Abby Sandel

Nameberry is lucky enough to have millions of visitors every month, and one of our favorite things to do is check out the baby names that catch your interest. It’s the basis of the Nameberry Top 1000, a list that includes many a favorite in the US and elsewhere in the English-speaking world, but also some baby names that are popular only on Nameberry – at least for now.

Let’s take a look at some of the gorgeous names for girls that are far more popular on Nameberry than they are in the US. Sometimes it’s clearly the influence of Britberries – Imogen, we’re looking at you! But often it just demonstrates that Nameberry readers are consistently ahead of the curve when it comes to choosing stylish baby names.

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posted by: karacavazos View all posts by this author
girl name alternatives

By Kara @ The Art of Naming

As you probably know, the US Social Security Administration tallies up the names of all the babies born within a year and reveals which names were most popular. While there are clearly thousands of parents who are happy using popular names, there are also parents who would rather avoid them.

For those parents who may secretly like the sound of the top names but hate their popularity, I’ve created a list of alternative options to the Top 10 names for girls.

The names may be similar in sound, syllables, initial letter, meaning, origin or a combination of those. None of the alternate names below rank on the SSA’s Top 1000 most popular names chart in 2014.

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top 10 girls

By Linda Rosenkrantz

When you hear the phrase ‘Top 10 girls’ name,’ you might tend to think of classics like Mary and Elizabeth, or later long-running favorites Jennifer and Jessica, or the current Sophia.  But it certainly wouldn’t be Bertha—which in fact was in that golden group for twelve years– or Mildred, up there for close to a quarter of a century.

I became curious about what became of these once mega-popular appellations, whose top positions lasted from 37 years to being one-time-wonders (bearing in mind that they well might have been top-ranked for years before the SSA started keeping figures in 1880), particularly those that were once in the Top 10 but now reside outside the Top 500, thus eliminating evergreens like, yes, Mary and Elizabeth that have retained their popularity. You might find a few surprises here–unless you’ve known a lot of Tammys and Tracys in your life.

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At the beginning of the year, we like to flip back the calendar a hundred years to see what the baby name landscape looked like a century ago. 1914 was a year in which World War I was in full swing, the year that President Wilson officially established Mother’s Day, Charlie Chaplin and Babe Ruth made their debuts, and saw the births of Dylan Thomas, Jonas Salk and Joe DiMaggio.But the babyname universe was relatively calm, as we can see by looking at the stable top dozen girls’ names. Here, they are, in order of their 1914 popularity, and what their status is today:

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posted by: Abby View all posts by this author

by Abby Sandel of  Appellation Mountain

I love unusual names.  I can defend the wackiest of celebrity appellations, from North to Pilot to Blue.

And yet some parents feel pressure to avoid a popular name – or even a name that might become popular.

If you grew up answering to Jennie S. or Mike T., you might worry that Logan and Mia will have to sign every piece of schoolwork with their last initial, too.  But it might be a mistake to discard your long-time favorite name just because others have discovered how great it is, too.

Here are Ten Good Reasons to call your baby Ethan or Emma, Ava or Jake.

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