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Category: pagan baby names

easter14bunnies

Christmas may have its reindeer and holly, and Thanksgiving its turkeys, but no holiday has as many flowers and trees and animals associated with it as Easter, symbols that evolved from both pagan and Christian sources. From Jesus as “the Lamb of God,” to chicks and bunnies symbolizing abundant new life, to the Easter lily, there’s a wealth of baby name inspiration to be found in the flora and fauna of Easter.

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posted by: Dantea View all posts by this author
solticex

By Dantea, aka Angel Thomas

Since Nameberry has done its Christmas post, I thought it would be nice to do one to represent Yule and all the pagans on this site.

Yule, or The Winter Solstice, marks the death and rebirth of the Sun-god. It also marks the vanquishing of the Holly King, the god of the Waning Year, by the Oak King, the God of the Waxing Year. The Goddess, who was Death-in-Life at Midsummer, now shows her Life-in-Death aspect. Modern Christmas celebrations are full of pagan symbology. Santa Claus is the Holly King, the sleigh is the solar chariot, the eight reindeer are the eight Sabbats– their horns representing the Horned God– the North Pole symbolizes the Land of Shadows and the dying solar year, and the gifts are meant both to welcome the Oak King as the sun reborn and as a reminder of the gift of the Holly King, who must depart for the Oak King to rule.

There are several herbs that are used to decorate the Pagan household at this time of year. We adorn doorways and mantles with evergreen boughs and  bunches of dried summer herbs. Our ancient ancestors brought an evergreen tree inside to ensure that there would be light all year round. The evergreen retains sunlight, staying green all year, and reminds us that life is forever present and renewable.

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Names Inspired by Tarot Cards

posted by: IsadoraVega View all posts by this author
tarot-cards

By Isadora Vega, Bewitching Names

Tarot cards are arguably the most popular form of divination in the modern Pagan world. Let’s see if there are any names to be gleaned from them.

Tarot cards were invented in medieval Italy as a regular deck of playing cards. It’s probably not surprising then that the original iconography was a lot more Catholic than it is today. They didn’t really become associated with mysticism or the occult until the 1700′s. The major arcana has 22 cards and was originally called the trump cards because they were used for gambling. The minor arcana looks a lot more like a regular deck of playing cards except instead of clubs, diamonds, hearts, and spades there’s cups, wands, pentacles, and swords. Each card has a pictogram that represents a certain concept.

It is a myth that Pagans use tarot cards to “see the future” in a literal sense. Most people who give readings will tell you that tarot cards show you the forces at work in your life and help you see what your next steps should be.

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