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Dickensian Baby Names: Part Two

Dickens Baby Names

By K. M. Sheard, Nook of Names

Here is the second part of Kay Sheard’s extensive rundown of names from Dickens that might work best for babies.

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Literary Baby Names: What the Dickens! Part 1

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literary baby names

By K. M. Sheard, Nook of Names

Charles Dickens is probably the greatest of all nineteenth century novelists — and a contender for the greatest novelist of all time. His works also provide a mine of wonderful names. Here is a selection of those which have fabulous potential for a baby born two hundred years on…

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royal names

With speculation already swirling around the possible name(s) of the next royal child and with Victoria surfacing once again as a possibility, we were inspired to take a look at what K. M Sheard of Nook of Names had to say about it the first time around.

It is a little ironic that Victoria would now be considered a very traditional and conventional choice for a royal baby.

That wasn’t true when Victoria was named; Victoria — Latin for “victory” — was a rare name in Britain at the time, although it had been in use since the sixteenth century, one of the names plucked from Classical Antiquity. For to the Romans, Victoria was the personification of victory, and worshipped as a Goddess.

Why did Victoria receive such a name? Because that’s what her mother was called. She was Marie Louise Viktoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfield.

It wasn’t actually Queen Victoria’s first name, either. That was Alexandrina, after Tsar Alexander I of Russia.

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french3-kls

By K. M. Sheard, Nook of Names

During a month spent in France a little while back, I came across quite a few interesting names.

These are some of the zestiest:

FILLES:

Aglaé. French form of the Greek mythological name Aglaia, “splendor” and “beauty.”

Alizée. Modern French name from alizé, “trade wind.” Popularized by the French singer Alizée Jacotey (b.1984).

Bérengère. Feminine form of the Old German name Berenger, “bear-spear.”

Cerise. Adoption of French word cerise, “cherry.”

Flavie. French form of Flavia, a Roman family name from Latin flavus “yellow.”

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peake

By K. M. Sheard, Nook of Names

The first volume of the magnificent Gormenghast trilogy by British novelist Mervyn Peake was published in 1946, and his books are still widely read today. Here are some of the best names (and characters!) from the trilogy:

Titus. Titus Groan, 77th Earl of Groan is the hero of the series, and Titus Groan is the title of the first book, despite the fact that Titus is only a baby in it. He becomes the major protagonist, however, in the following novels, and though he doesn’t actually do much in Titus Groan, he is the pivot around whom the story unfolds. Titus was a Roman praenomen — i.e. the closest thing Romans had to a first name. Probably the best-known bearer was the Emperor Titus (39-81 CE). The origins are very obscure; it may possibly be related to Latin titulus ‘title’ or titio ‘fire-brand’. It was first used as a given name in the English-speaking world in the sixteenth century.

Fuchsia. Lady Fuchsia Groan is Titus’s sister, a girl on the cusp of womanhood. Virtually ignored by her parents, she is half-feral,  fiercely proud and passionate. Her name is taken from the delicate, ballerina-like flower, named in the eighteenth century in honor of the sixteenth century German botanist Leonhard Fuchs — a surname meaning ‘fox’ in German. Fuchsia is first found as a given name in the nineteenth century, when flower names first came into fashion.

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