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Category: nicknames for boys

name teasing

Pam Spam: That was a rare one, easy to ignore.

But Pammy, said in a whine-y, wheedle-y voice, was more hurtful.  To this day, if someone wants to get under my skin (I’m looking at you, Cousin Michael), they call me Pammy.

Were you ever teased about your name?  In what way?  How hurtful was it — did it verge on bullying, or was it more affectionate, even a sign of popularity?

And what about your children’s names?  Did you look for a name that was tease-proof, or at least one that would not lend itself to teasing?

Has your child gotten teased about his or her name?  Do you find people more tolerant and less prone to name-teasing today than they were when you were growing up?

Please tell us your experiences around names and teasing — either about your own name or the names of your children and loved ones.

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lovehatedolls

We got the idea for this Question of the Week from a forum thread titled, Loving Frederick, hating Fred, by a mom who wants to name her son Frederick but really, really, really does not want him to be called Fred or Freddie.

This is an issue that plagues many parents: Loving a name, but not its logical short form.  Or sometimes, it’s the other way around: An affection for Theo or Edie, say, but not so much for Theodore or Edith.

So our question of the week is: What name, is any, inspires this love-hate relationship in you?

Did you choose a name — or do you have a name — whose long form you love and short form you don’t or vice versa, and how do you handle it?  How does that work out for you?  Would you put the short form you love on the birth certificate and sidestep the long form you don’t entirely?

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Nickname Names for Boys

Cute-Baby-Boy-Wallpaper-1

by Pamela Redmond Satran

A friend of ours recently named his baby Jake.  Not Jacob, just Jake.

Why name the kid Jacob, he and his wife reasoned, when they weren’t really crazy about it and intended to call the little boy Jake all the time anyway?

Nickname names have become increasingly popular and fashionable for children of both sexes over the past handful of years, in both the U.S. and the U.K.  They’re evidence of a new informality along with a rebellion against putting a formal name on the birth certificate just because you’re supposed to.

Popular nicknames names for boys in the U.S. include the following, all in the Top 350:

Liam (6 — originated as a short form of William)

Jack (46)

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Nickname Names: How did Henry get to Hank?

nicknamex

by Linda Rosenkrantz

A Berry recently posted a request for a blog explaining the origins of some of the common nicknames—more properly diminutives or pet forms– for classic names that seem to be miles apart.  And of course we aim to please, so…..

There is a certain logic to it all, as well as some whimsy. The simplest road to a pet form is, obviously, by shortening it to its first one or two syllables, as in Di for Diana, Ben for Benjamin, Archie for Archibald and Eliza for Elizabeth.  Occasionally, a middle syllable will do the job, leading to Liz for Elizabeth and Xan for Alexander.  (Where this gets a little tricky is when the pronunciation of the base name has changed over the years—Richard seems to have been often pronounced Rickard at one time, resulting in the nickname Rick and his rhyming cousin Dick, with Dick then becoming so popular that the phrase “every Tom, Dick and Harry” became a euphemism for Everyman. Or a sprinkling of the letters in the name could lead, say, from Dorothy to Dot

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Baby Boy Names: The long and short of it

boy baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

A friend is searching for baby boy names that start out long – three or more syllables long – and can be reduced to one-syllable nicknames.

If you’ve got a two-syllable last name, this is a good strategy. You end up with not one but two euphonic pairings.  And your child has the benefit of a proper, even imposing formal name as well as a short, friendly, accessible nickname.

Some stylish options for long baby boy names with short nicknames:

AbrahamAbe or Bram

AlexanderLex or Xan

Augustine or AugustusGus

Balthazar or Lazarus – Zar 

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