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Dantea Berry Juice profile image

Best Names Given to Just 5 Babies

posted by: Dantea View all posts by this author
5 babies

By Dantae

As I did last year last year, I’ve now compiled a list of the best – in my opinion – names given to just five babies last year. I tried to keep to only conventionally spelled names or properly spelled variations, such as Agathe and Olivine.

Girls:

Agathe – This is the Greek spelling of Agatha, meaning “good.” Agathe von Trapp was the oldest daughter in the famous von Trapp, known in The Sound of Music as Liesl. There’s a Saint Agatha and the writer Agatha Christie. Agathe is a strong name with a cute nickname: Aggie.

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Baby Names: Advice from Twitter

hashtag baby names

By Abby Sandel

Let’s talk #growingupwithmyname.

The Twitter hashtag has users venting about the frustrations of growing up as Zac or Marni, Crystle or Kalie, Sam or Karanna.

If you’re expecting a child, do the complaints translate into good baby naming advice?

Maybe.

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Modern Takes on Ancient Greek Names

posted by: elizabethS View all posts by this author
Greek baby names

By Stephanie Bruce

Whether you’d like to honor Yiayia and Papou but are worried about pronunciation issues, or you’re looking for a fresh take on classic names with long histories, the nicknames and variations of traditional Greek names below will give you numerous options when finding a suitable moniker for your little one.

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The Way We Name Today: 9 Baby Name Trends

baby name trends

By Abby Sandel

When it comes to baby name trends, it’s tempting to declare that the classics are back, or that originality is the new rule. And some weeks, it does feel like everyone is sticking with tried-and-true names, or turning to the dictionary, or just drawing letters from a bag of Scrabble tiles.

But baby name trends are often subtle. It’s not always about a name. It’s about a letter, a sound, or a style. Or maybe trends are about where we find our inspiration for our children’s names, even how we think about them.

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posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
B2-QUEENBESS

By Eleanor Nickerson of British Baby Names

Brits love diminutives. We use them, often automatically, to shorten names in a familiar way, and they have been essential for centuries as a way of distinguishing individuals with the same name. We love them so much, many of them have now been elevated into full-name status, and happily litter the Top 100.

The most common are two-syllable, ie/y-endings we know and love well; Isabelles are Izzy, Olivers are Ollie, Katherines are Katies and Fredericks are Freddies.  But more and more, parents are looking to a more brisk and quirky style of diminutive. Edwards are often Ned, rather than Eddy; several Henrys are Hal, and Christophers are the striking Kit rather than Chris.

With this niche trend in mind, here is a rundown of some one-syllable diminutives that have become overlooked since they were developed in the Middle Ages. Several of them, perhaps surprisingly, were unisex.

Bess

In the 16th century Bess was a popular nickname for Elizabeth. You could almost say that it was the diminutive for the name, as the most famous bearer, Elizabeth I, was known fondly as “Good Queen Bess“. It began to lose favour in the 18th century, but was revived as Bessie in the 19th. In some instances, Bess was also used as a diminutive for Beatrice.

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