Names Searched Right Now:

Category: namenapping

namenapping

We all know you’re not a namenapper.

You’d never steal somebody else’s baby name, whether it’s a friend, a family member, or even (maybe especially) a celebrity who happened to pick a really amazing name.

Unless….

Unless you were answering Nameberry’s question of the week, and it were all theoretical, and you knew you weren’t going to baby name jail for it.  Or going to have to face the anger of the erson whose name you stole or the disapproval of everyone you know along with lots of virtual friends on the Nameberry message boards.

Read More

babysurprised

Ideally, choosing your baby’s name is a fun, inspired endeavor, but too often baby name problems get in the way.  Here are the problems we hear most often, and how to fix them:

Your family interferes with your name choice

Your mom wants you to name the baby after her.  His dad wants you to name the baby after his mom.  And everybody hates the name you’ve chosen….and isn’t shy about telling you so.  Name discussions with family can be an illuminating way to pass your pregnancy, but the minute family members start to act like they have equal voting rights, it’s time to cut off the talks.  Bowing to family name pressure is the Number 1 reason for name regret.

Your friend ruins the name you love

Read More

samenamex

Today’s QOW was inspired by a comment from jgirl525.

This week it’s a two-parter:

a.  What’s your response when you meet someone who shares your own first name? Do you feel an instant kinship or do you feel more proprietary?  If it’s a popular name, do you immediately start comparing nicknames and wondering why your parents chose a name like, say, Jennifer, of which there are now (literally) 1,424,755 in the world?

If it’s an unusual name, do you feel just a little bit resentful that it’s not yours alone?

Read More

Family Names: Too close for comfort?

familytree6

Today’s Question of the Week concerns family names:

Would you use a name that’s the same as, or very similar to, one used by another family member? 

Would it depend on the closeness of your relationship—is it different for a sister’s child than it is to a second cousin’s?

Does it depend on geographical distance—say if your Declan would be growing up in Boston and your cousin’s Declan lives in Denver and they would rarely get together?

How about closely-related or variations of the same name, eg Sophie/Sophia or Asher/Ashton or Bella/Isabella—in other words names similar enough to confuse Great-Grandma?

Read More

Unique Baby Names: Is there such a thing??

babiesfishbowlnames

This blog is adapted from our most recent book, Beyond Ava & Aiden: The Enlightened Guide to Naming Your Baby

When people look for baby names online, they often put in a search for “unique names.” Some of them are trying to find names that are unusual and distinctive, but some really do want to give their child a name that’s truly one-of-a-kind, something that nobody else has.

A recent newspaper story claimed that one of the reasons for this is because modern parents want their child to be “Googleable,” to have a name that’s different enough that it will pop out online. And some parents say they won’t settle on a name until they find out whether its url is available.

Of course, as soon as you give your child a “unique” name, it all but guarantees it won’t be unique anymore since someone will almost inevitably poach it. We were tickled to find, for instance, that someone posted on our website bulletin board that she’d named her son Knox, a name that wasn’t in our or any other baby-naming book –  months before Angelina and Brad chose it for their newborn son, launching it on the track to widespread use.

When we asked visitors to our website to tell us what they’d named their babies, we never expected their answers to provide such a trove of highly unusual – yes, even unique – names. Some of these turn gender on its ear, some twist spellings in different ways, some reintroduce ancient or ethnic names or transform place names or surnames, and some are conjured from parents’ fertile brains.

Now here is where you would ordinarily expect to find a long list of distinctive, never-heard-before names.  But that would be against the spirit of this style.  So you’ll just have to find–or create–one of your own.

For more of our ideas on unusual names, check out Beyond Ava & Aiden: The Enlightened Guide to Naming Your Baby

Read More