Names Searched Right Now:

Category: name predictions

Dax-Shepard--Kristen-Bell-jpg

By Tara Ryazansky

High profile celeb couple and unique baby namers, Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard have mentioned in more than a few interviews that they’re “completely stumped” when it comes to naming baby #2. They already have a one-year-old girl named Lincoln, a name that they chose when Bell was pregnant and decided to use regardless of the sex of their child.

Will they take the same unusual approach once again? Will they go with a theme and pick something like presidential Kennedy, or another Nebraska city like Omaha, or the auto-related Ford?

Here are my suggestions for the couple.

Read More

posted by: Abby View all posts by this author
2033g1

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Americans are more daring when it comes to naming daughters, and the numbers bear this out.

In 2013, just over 67% of girls born in the US received a Top 1000 name.  Boys, on the other hand, received a Top 1000 name nearly 79% of the time.

It makes predicting the most popular names of the future slightly more difficult when it comes to girls.  With everything from surnames – Madison and Addison – to enduring choices like Emily and Elizabeth in the current Top 20, it’s tough to say which direction parents will go in the future.

Or maybe we’ll just keep going in every possible direction.  This list is a little bit literary, slightly musical, occasionally globetrotting, sometimes unisex.

Read More

posted by: Nick View all posts by this author
stockmarket

By Nick Turner

Investors often rely on charts and technical analysis to decide whether to buy or sell a stock. That means they focus less on the fundamental qualities of the company (say, whether sales are growing or it has a good CEO), and instead concentrate on the movements of its share price. If the chart is displaying a certain pattern — one that has been historically shown to foreshadow a rise in value — the investor will buy the stock.

Having spent my career deciphering stock charts as a financial journalist, I suppose it seemed natural to apply the same techniques when coming up with baby names. After all, the popularity of names tends to move in hundred-year cycles, and the same patterns repeat over and over again. That means you can spot a good name based on its chart alone.

Read More

abbypotenmax

This week, for The Nameberry 9, Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel looks at new names that might make their way onto future Top 1000 lists.

 Are you still drowning in data? I had barely finished devouring every bit of analysis regarding the new US Top 1000 before the state data started to pour in. Emma is tops in North Dakota, and Mason and Olivia won Most Likely to Appear on a Birth Certificate in Utah.

Baby name news was all over the mainstream media, too. NPR and The New Yorker weighed in on name trends. Jimmy Kimmel was one of many to pick up on the influence of reality television – he quipped that if he ever has twins, he’ll christen them Toddler and Tiara.

There’s no denying it – when it comes to baby name trends, what’s in the headlines has an impact. A notable name is not guaranteed to catch on – Snooki and Katniss remain rarities. Still, it is an important part of the puzzle – a source of inspiration and new ideas that we all tune into, almost constantly, on our smartphones and tablets and televisions and magazines at the grocery check-out line.

Last week brought us plenty of notable names likely to have an impact when we look at future years’ Top 1000 lists:

Read More

baby name Rowan

Our second Berry Question of the Week comes from Blaire, who lives in Asheville, North Carolina.  The mom of infant daughter Rowan (that’s her in the adorable picture), Blaire writes:

“I really would appreciate a little input on trends, since you guys are so good at predicting the next “hot” baby names.

I have always wanted three children and have pretty much known what I wanted to name them for years. My daughter and first child Rowan Jane was born in October 2011 and since then I have been seeing Rowan literally everywhere.  I thought it wasn’t that popular. =(

Since I want to avoid this in the future, my question is about my other two favorite names. My other favorite girl’s name is Wren.. and my boy’s name is Milo. What are your honest opinions on Wren and Milo?  Are they becoming popular and/or trendy?  Do you see them skyrocketing in the near future?

Read More