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Category: Linda Rosenkrantz

state names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

When it comes to picking a place name for your child, you could consider a continent like Asia, a country like India, a city like Vienna or Verona…or one of the select group of U.S. states that lend themselves to babies’ birth certificates. Here are the Nameberry picks of the best state names and how they came to be—with their mix of Native American, British and French origins.

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july babies

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Yes, yes, yet another bonanza of great names this month—fabulous firsts, interesting middles, harmonious sibsets! And, once again, the intriguing stories behind the choices. First of all, three lovely pairs of twin girls:

Antoinette July and Cordelia Somerset

Estelle Ophelia and Scarlett Allison

Giselle Victoria and Tatiana Louisa

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cowboy baby names

There’s just something about a cowboy name. So lean and lanky, with a relaxed, ambling swagger that calls up the (perhaps romanticized) romance of the Old West. From real life frontier heroes to the characters and stars of early movie westerns and 1950s TV shows, these names project a nostalgic image that’s pretty dang irresistible.

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shakespeare baby names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Some names scream out their Shakespearean heritage–think Hamlet, Macbeth, Desdemona, Ophelia, Iago, Romeo–while others carry a more subtle reference to their ties to the Bard. We’re looking here towards the bottoms of the cast lists, at the secondary characters who might be a servant or a follower or friend.  So to avoid Romeo always being followed by Juliet, you can pick one of these that have a less pronounced Shakespearean tie.

Angusa good old Scottish name from “the Scottish play,” Macbeth, in which he is a general and the thane of Glamis, influenced by the prophesies of the three witches. Also the god of love and youth in Irish myth, Angus is especially popular in Australia now, thanks to AC/DC rocker Angus Young.

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baby name Jett

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Back in the 1930s and 40s, girls’ names ending in the feminissima French suffix “ette” were the cat’s pajamas. There were glamorous movie stars named Claudette, Paulette and Jeanette, and lots of little girls dubbed Annette and Nanette. But now a funny thing has happened on the way to the nursery: the final ‘e’ has disappeared and suddenly ‘ett’ is one of the hottest endings for boys.

In the recently released list of top names on Nameberry so far this year, there were three two-syllable ‘ett’ boys in the Top 45—Emmett, Everett and Beckett, while also high up on the national list were Bennett, Garrett and Barrett—and if you throw in the single syllable Jett, Rhett and Brett, and sharing the double ‘t’ Wyatt and Elliott, you’ve got the makings of a full soccer team.

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