Category: Italian baby names

Italian Baby Names: Straight from the Map

Italian baby names

By Abby Sandel

America’s Next Top Model winner Lisa D’Amato recently welcomed her second son. Amato and husband Adam Friedman named their new addition Venice Sire, a little brother for Daxel Vaughn.

Place names are big for boys and girls alike, from Brooklyn (Beckham) to Caspian (son of Neve Campbell) to Ava Berlin (daughter of Jeremy Renner). But could it be that Italy is a hotbed for wearable place names?

Some of these Italian baby names feel traditional, even vintage. Others could make bold, unexpected picks for a child’s name. Whether Italian baby names honor your heritage, or simply express your love of the country, there is something here here to please every style.

Read More

Romantic Italian Baby Names

Romantic baby names

Today we celebrate the birthday of Leonardo da Vinci, namesake of that other Leonardo–whose pregnant mother was said to have been inspired while looking at a da Vinci painting in Florence when she felt baby Leo‘s first kick. Now the name Leonardo has been embraced internationally, but there are other Italian Renaissance artists whose names are also as great as their art. So if you love romantic boys’ names with the magical o-ending, here are a few worth considering, whether or not you have Italian roots.

Read More

Italian Baby Names: Popularity and trends

Italian baby names

By Romina Angeleri

Nora Ephron was once asked to write her autobiography in six words. Here it is: “Secret to life, marry an Italian.” Whether or not you follow her advice, you don’t need to go all that way in order to give an Italian name to your baby!

Italian names often have layered meanings and a lot of romance, which makes them a great choice for naming your baby. At the same time – and for much the same reasons – searching for a good Italian name can be tricky. Names that sound perfectly fine to American ears may not be real options in Italy, if, for example, they might sound old-fashioned or carry strong regional connotations. Take Teodora: here’s a great-sounding, but also ancient-sounding name that virtually no one in Italy has chosen for decades. Or Calogero – a once-popular name that has been out of fashion for quite a while.

Read More

international names

Names travel among cultures further and faster now than ever before.

In the US, rising stars include the Irish Maeve and Declan, the Spanish Mateo and the Arabic Imani.

The British like such French names as Sophie and Chloe, while in France there’s a craze for British names such as Emma and Tom.  And then there are those names used throughout Europe that are gaining some attention in the US: Cosima, Leonie, Roman.

Read More

posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More Than Matilda

I recently released an e-book called International Baby Names for Australian Parents, to help Australian parents find names that are uncommon, but not strange. My theory was that was a name that had never ranked here, yet was on the charts in other countries, would fit the bill of being seen as both “unusual” and “normal”.

Here are some names from the book that have never ranked in English-speaking countries, but are in the Top 100 elsewhere in the world.


Anouk (Top 100 in the Netherlands)

Hip and quirky while still having substance. As a short form of Anna, provides an alternative to that and related names.

Ginevra (Top 100 in Italy)

Best known from spunky redhead GinevraGinny” Weasley in the Harry Potter books. Romantic and with tons of nickname options, this could also honour a Jennifer, as it’s the Italian form of Guinevere.

Read More