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Category: Irish names for boys

boy names in translation

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Now it’s the boy’s turn to romance their names.

We recently posted a list of 100 girls’ names in translation, where we took some rather prosaic appellations like Helen, Henrietta and Hedwig, and gave them some international flair via their translations into other languages. Well, several of you asked us to do the same for the boys, and so here they are. Of course there are countless other versions and variations—maybe you’ll find the honor replacement you’ve been looking for!

Ralph and Roland, meet Raoul and Orlando.

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Undiscovered Irish Baby Names

Irish baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

The immigration of Irish baby names to the US has been going on for decades and just won’t quit, with the original Bridget and Patrick succeeded by Kathleen and Kevin, Kelly and Conor, who were followed by the current crop of babies named Aidan and Liam and Riley and Maeve.

So who’s left? Incredibly enough, there are still plenty of undiscovered Irish names ripe for import. The names here are all widely used in contemporary Ireland, are accessible in terms of spelling and pronunciation, yet are virtually unknown in the US.

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The Irish Names of “Brooklyn”

Movie Brooklyn names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Whether or not you’ve seen the touching new movie Brooklyn, based on the Colm Tóibín novel, you’re probably aware of its award-winning star, Irish actress Saoirse Ronin, and maybe even know how to pronounce it. The name of her character in the film is Éilis Lacey, another name with a surprising pronunciation and appealing sound.

And there are other Irish names associated with the production, including those of the other actors, characters and players behind the scenes, that are well worth noting and considering—several with rich histories in Celtic mythology.

Here they are, with their pronunciations:

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celtic14

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Like most people, I love Celtic names, which makes it a lot of fun to check out the Irish and Scottish birth announcements in their local newspapers every so often, with their mix of revived Irish Gaelic names and familiar English appellations, and often surprising—to us—first and middle combos. All the babes listed below made their debuts in 2014, and they include such beauts as Libby Letitia and BobbyCharles Jack.

Pronunciation of Irish names can be a minefield for non-Gaelic speakers, as words/names are not pronounced phonetically and there are many variations in dialect. If you need pronunciation help, you can get audio assistance at this site: http://www.babynamesofireland.com/.

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Boys’ Names 2013: Soft new choices

By Georgia Brizuela

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Sssssssssh, have you heard the secret?

There may be a lot of Wild and Wilder names around these days, but boys’ names are also going in a softer direction.

The sh sound is stylish — or should that be shtylish? — for baby boys’ names, introduced by Joshua and Sean and led these days by such trendy choices as Asher and Dashiell.

Among the attractive sh names for boys are the following:

Asher — The Old Testament Asher, which means “fortunate, blessed, happy one,” was one of Jacob’s twelve sons who gave their names to the clans of Israel.  Contemporary diminutive: Ash.

Ashton –This English name meaning “ash trees place” became a mega-hit in 2004, mostly thanks to TV star/model Ashton Kutcher’s popular prank show Punk’d.

Bishop — Actress Reese Witherspoon got the ball rolling on ecclesiastical occupational names when she named her son Deacon in 2003.

Cash — A diminutive of Cassius or an economy-inspired word name, cool name Cash may also pay homage to American music legend Johnny Cash.

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