Category: famous names

4ofjuly2

With apologies to our dear Britberries, today we honor some of the heroes in the struggle of the US to gain its independence from the mother country, along with some of the more interestingly named Signers of the Declaration of Independence.

REVOLUTIONARY PERIOD HEROES

AARON Burr—fought in the War for Independence before he served as Vice President and fought his famous duel

ALEXANDER Hamilton—served as aide-de-camp to General George Washington during the Revolutionary War, before his later accomplishments

ANTHONY Wayne – won major recognition for bravery as a general in the American Revolution, also known as (oops!) “Mad” Anthony Wayne

ARTEMAS Ward —  an important general in the war and a Congressman from Massachusetts

AUSTIN Dabney – a slave who became a private in the Georgia militia and fought the British

BETSY (Elizabeth) Ross—even though she well might not have made the first American flag

CASIMIR Pulaski – Polish-born “Father of the American Cavalry” under Washington

CRISPUS Attucks – a fugitive slave who became the first casualty of the Revolution when he was shot and killed in the Boston Massacre

DEBORAH Sampson — first known woman to impersonate a man in order to join the army and take part in combat

EBENEZER Learned – a brigadier general in the Continental Army

ENOCH Poor –another brigadier general, called by Washington “an officer of distinguished merit”

ESEK Hopkins – a Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Navy during the war

ETHAN Allen – war hero who formed the Green Mountain Boys and was responsible for the capture of Fort Ticonderoga

EVAN Shelby, Jr – a Revolutionary War militia leader

HAYM Salomon – Polish-born Jewish immigrant who played a key role in financing the Revolution

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July baby names

For this first day of July, guest blogger and prized nameberry intern, Sonia Tsuruoka looks into the special name possibilities for a baby born this month.

Considering July-inspired names?

Try Julian and Julia,  the two endlessly popular offshoots of the classic Julius.  Though more soft-spoken than the original, both retain an appealing measure of power and nobility that might explain why Hollywood A-listers like Jerry Seinfeld, Robert De Niro, and Lisa Kudrow chose Julian for their sons.

Yet there’s more to these J-names than meets the eye. Along with their many variants, Julian and Julia draw additional strength from their rich, historical roots, while also offering an assortment of sleeker, modern alternatives.

One of the earliest records of the surname Julius tracks back to Rome’s most famous patrician family, the gens Julia, who laid claim to history’s best-known Roman dictator, Gaius Julius Caesar, and boasted descent from the mythological hero Julus. The family’s shared bloodline with several Olympian gods was even outlined by Virgil in the Aeneid, leading many scholars to argue that Julian, translating to “Jove’s child” in English, references Jupiter, the Roman god of sky and thunder. Others suggest that Julian means everything from “youthful” to “downy-bearded,” leaving much of the name’s etymological origins shrouded in mystery.

Julian, borne by many illustrious saints and emperors, was coolly received in the Middle Ages, when it was first introduced, but quickly gained momentum in Italy and France during the Renaissance, in more regionalized versions like Giuliano and JulienJulia — its female variant –mirrored such popularity trends, only becoming common in the English-speaking world during the 1700’s. Both names, however, were bestowed upon several important literary and religious figures in earlier centuries, including Saint Julian the Hospitaller, patron saint of travelers, Julian the Apostate, Rome’s last pagan Emperor, St. Julia of Corsica, and Proteus’ lover Julia in William Shakespeare’s Two Gentlemen of Verona.  And Juliet— a softer, more romantic female variant– was, of course, also used by the legendary playwright in his best-known tragedy, Romeo and Juliet.

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FATHER’S DAY NAMES: Celebrity Dads

elizabeth taylor father

Once more this year we commemorate Father’s Day with a list of some notable names of the paternal parents of celebrities of various times and places, with some truly unusual examples, as in Archulus (Truman Capote) and Belmont (Humphrey Bogart). As with the moms we displayed on Mother’s Day, it turns out that quite a  number of past (and a few present) notables have had Dads with interesting, and sometimes surprising, names.  Here are some examples to prove the point:

ABRAHAMBOB DYLAN

ALFRED —  JOHN LENNON

ALLAN HERMAN MELVILLE

ANDREJ —   ANDY WARHOL

ANDREW —   ROY ROGERS

ARCHULUS —  TRUMAN CAPOTE

AUGUSTINE —  GEORGE WASHINGTON

BAILEYRAY CHARLES, MAYA ANGELOU

BELMONT —  HUMPHREY BOGART

CASSIUS —  MOHAMMED ALI

CLARENCE —   ERNEST HEMINGWAY

CLYDE JOHN WAYNE

CORNELIUS —  TENNESSEE WILLIAMS

DELBERT —    GENE AUTRY

ELIAS —   WALT DISNEY, CARY GRANT

EMILE —   HENRI MATISSE

ERNEST—   ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG

FERNANDO —  LUCIANO PAVAROTTI

FRANCIS —   ELIZABETH TAYLOR (shown)

FRASERMICHELLE OBAMA

GADLA —   NELSON MANDELA

GERARD —  LAURENCE OLIVIER

GERRIT —   REMBRANDT VAN RIJN

GUSTAV —   ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER

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1868e

Memorial Day was officially proclaimed on May 5, 1868 and first observed on May 30 of that year, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.  So this year, instead of looking back again at the names of Civil War generals and such, I thought it could be more enlightening to look instead at well-known people (with interesting names) who were born in 1868—giving us a bird’s-eye view of some aspects of post-Civil War baby naming, both in America and elsewhere.

 

GIRLS

ALEEN Cust, first British female veternarian

ALIDA B. Jones, early movie actress

ALMA Kruger, Shakespearean actress, later featured in Dr. Kildare movies

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Athlete Names: Tennis, anyone??

tennis1

We’ve talked about the names of great poets and painters and musicians and worthy political and social namesakes, but one area we’ve somewhat neglected is athlete names.

The names of tennis champs are interesting because they include both genders and are international in scope.  And since the US Open (then called the US Men’s Singles Championship) dates back to 1881and the Women’s to 1887, with Wimbledon starting in 1877 and the Davis Cup to 1900, there’s plenty of opportunity to look back and include some cool  vintage names as well.

These are the names of tennis champs (and a few high-ranked contenders who didn’t quite make it to the very top) with possess distinctive names—so sorry John, Bill and BillieJean.

GIRLS

ALICE Marble

ALINE Terry

ALTHEA Gibson

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