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Category: dancers’ names

ballet preparation

Coincidentally or not, many dancers have names that aptly project an image of lightness and grace. And this cuts across many disciplines of dance, from toe to tap, and across generations as well. As with all artistic children, we have to wonder how much influence the parents who chose their creative baby names had on their offspring’s vocations. Is it serendipitous that ballerina Allegra Kent was given a name that projects such a quintessentially dancer-like image? But hold on–before we jump to conclusions, you’ll see that half of the dancers shown chose their own terpsichorean names.
Here are the Nameberry Picks of best dancers’ names.

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Lemony Snicket Names

lemony

We are honored to have as today’s guest bloggers Don and Alleen Nilsen, recent co-chairmen of the prestigious American Name Society, writing about the clever use of literary allusions in the thirteen Lemony Snicket books.

As long-distance grandparents, we are constantly on the lookout for books that we can enjoy listening to on CDs while we commute to work and can then forward to our children to enjoy with their children while they make their own commutes.  Daniel Handler’s thirteen Lemony Snicket books have been the all-time winners in this category, and one of the reasons is Handler’s skill in recycling the names of literary or pop culture figures to make playful allusions.

Humor scholars use the term Wabbit literacy (from “that wascally wabbit” in the Bugs Bunny cartoons) to describe the flip-flop process in which children become acquainted with the names of classical figures through pop culture allusions prior to meeting the  same names in “the original.”  The Lemony Snicket books are a superb illustration of this process as children meet Dr. Georgina Orwell, an eye doctor who hangs an ever-watchful eye over her door; Uncle Monty, who as a herpetologist cares for a huge python; a villainous couple named Esmé and Jerome Squalor who live at 667 Dark Avenue, c.f. J. D. Salinger‘s short story “To Esmé with Love and Squalor,” and Mr. Poe, who has a son named Edgar and is the appointed guardian of the children’s inheritance which is placed in the Mulctuary Money Management Bank.

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ballerina names

One of the staples of the holiday season is The Nutcracker ballet, making this the perfect moment  for balletomane Heather Stevenson‘s guest blog on the enchanted world of exotic ballerina names.

Many little girls proclaim that they want to be ballerinas when they grow up—most are drawn to the sequined tutus, the rhinestone tiaras, the shiny satin pointe shoes, and the chance to wear make-up.  (Leaping and twirling to music are bonuses.)  As a little girl, I was not immune to these charms, and I began studying ballet at the age of ten.  Perhaps unlike most girls who take up dance, however, part of ballet’s appeal to me was that it fed my growing fascination with names.  Read the program at just about any ballet performance, or pick up a book on dance history, and you will find an array of beautiful ballerina names of many different nationalities.

A hundred years ago, the Ballets Russes began presenting their first performances in Paris.  Comprised predominantly of expatriate Russians, the fledgling company became wildly popular, and interest in dance soared.  Touring companies such as the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo were offshoots of the original Ballets Russes, and they brought ballet to small towns all across the United States.   Additionally, Russian choreographer George Balanchine honed his talent with the Ballets Russes, and eventually immigrated to America, where he began what was to become the New York City Ballet.  The glamour of these dancers who had traveled the world before showing up in places like Lincoln, Nebraska was matched by their exotic, “Russified” names.  For instance, Lilian Alicia Marks, an English girl who danced with the original Ballets Russes, became Alicia Markova.

These days, most dancers keep their own names, but that hasn’t made reading the roster of a company’s performers any less exciting or exotic.  The American Ballet Theatre in New York, for example, has dancers from the Ukraine, Italy, Cuba, Spain, Argentina, Brazil, Japan, Russia, Uruguay, South Korea, England, France, China, Byelorussia, Australia, Finland, Portugal, and (of course) the United States in their ranks.

The language of ballet is French, but really, dance itself is the language that is spoken within ballet companies.  I myself have had more Russian and Chinese ballet teachers than American ones, and the fact that most of these teachers spoke little English was rarely a problem.  The international flavor of dance was enormously attractive to me as a young girl.  I grew up in Florida and my family never traveled anywhere.  I longed to see more of the world, but I settled for hearing about Beijing and St. Petersburg from my beloved teachers.

Reading magazines and books on dance, and seeing performances of different companies on television, I began to despair that I’d ever become a famous ballerina with a name like Heather Brown.  My favorite dancers had names like Altynai Asylmuratova, Alessandra Ferri, and Sylvie Guillem.  It seemed that you couldn’t be a ballerina without also having a lovely, feminine, and somewhat unique name.  That isn’t entirely true, of course, but reading about ballet could be a goldmine to expectant parents looking for underused girl names with a touch of the theatrical and glamorous .

Here are some intriguing names of dancers, past and present, along with the company with which they are most associated.  Some of these are stage names, but surprisingly, most are not:

ALLA Sizova (Kirov Ballet)

ALLEGRA Kent (New York City Ballet)

ANNELI Alhanko (Royal Swedish Ballet)

ANYA Linden (Royal Ballet)

AURÉLIE Dupont (Paris Opéra Ballet)

CORINA Dumitrescu (Bucharest National Opera Ballet)

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colette2

We looked at trailblazing women in Part One of this blog yesterday—bold and courageous achievers who would prove worthy namesakes for a daughter.  Now we turn to those with major accomplishments in the arts—a varied mix of writers, artists, and musicians of the far and fairly recent  past—many of whom seem to have appropriately creative names—whether they were born with them or not.

Again, remember that the name’s the thing here—so sorry, Mary Cassatt and Elizabeth Barrett Browning–not this time.

WRITERS

AGATHA Christie

ANAIS Nin

APHRA Behn (also seen on the trailblazer list)

AYN Rand

CARSON (born Lula) McCullers

CHARLOTTE Bronte

COLETTE (born Sidonie-Gabrielle Collette)

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