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Category: cool baby names

Unique Baby Names: Do you dare?

alice and cat

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Reading the latest birth announcement from England‘s Telegraph newspaper, I can’t help thinking that a lot of the names, while wonderful, might give many sensible parents pause.

Wilfred may be cool, after all, but it’s also undeniably nerdy – by choosing this name, am I condemning my child to playground marginalization?  Is Zephyr too wacky, Ophelia too tragic?

The question isn’t really, Do you dare to give these names to your children, but should you dare?

As many Britberries have pointed out, the names usually found in the Telegraph represent not widespread British naming trends but eccentric aristocratic tastes, so perhaps most of us aren’t debating the merits of Digby and Venetia in any case.

Before we focus on our question, a few trendlets to note: Several girls named Jessica.  Middle names Tom, Sue, and Adventure.  And in a reversal of American style, boys’ names generally more daring than girls’.

Back to the issue at hand: What do you think of these adventurous, intriguing, but perhaps too-challenging names taken from recent Telegraph birth announcements?  Would they work in the U.S….or anywhere else, for that matter?

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Nominate your favorite and win!

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You may have noticed an updated and improved feature on Nameberry recently: Most name pages now include a list of other suggested names.

If you like the unusual Welsh name Cadogan, for instance, you might also like Harrington, Lanier, and Adonis (really?) for boys, and Arianwen and Delancey for girls.

Or at least, according to millions of name ratings, other people who liked Cadogan also liked Harrington and Arianwen and the others.

I’ve become, okay, kind of obsessed with these name relationships, partly because they seem uncannily accurate and partly because they can be so surprising.  Clicking through on a trail of names I like, I’ve discovered lots of new selections that I also like but may not have considered before.

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posted by: upswingbabynames View all posts by this author
germLeni

by Angela Mastrodonato of Upswing Baby Names

My former boss from London once said that when he walked down the streets of Boston for the first time the experience was like, “looking into the eyes of every ethnicity and culture in the world.”

This diversity is a source of pride for many Americans. Consequently, when naming their offspring some Americans like to recognize the country of their ancestors.

And coincidentally most of these ancestors come from countries with lovely lyrical romance languages–languages such as Greek, Italian, and Spanish. There are also many Americans who claim Irish heritage, another source of trendy names.

I envied those Americans. My heritage doesn’t come from a place with a language that was considered lovely or fashionable when I had my kids.

The observant among you may notice my long, vowel-heavy last name that is–yes, Italian–and wonder why I was squawking.

I’m not Italian. Obscured by my married last name is my (mostly) German ancestry.

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posted by: denisekpotter View all posts by this author
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By Denise K. Potter, Nameberry

New Jersey gets no respect. We’ve been laughed at, lied to, hell—we’ve even endured some pretty serious storms. But hey, you have to hand it to us, we’re survivors. The Garden State has a lot going for it—like these baby names with history you’ve got to read to believe, written by yours truly, a proud ‘Joi-sey’ girl. You want to make something of it? And for all those who think we’re just a landfill: Dream on, read on, and just remember, we’re Jersey Strong; we can handle anything you’ve got.

Aberdeen- This Scottish place-name for girls can also refer to the beach-township in Monmouth County.

Alice- In 1920, the celebrated suffragist and women’s rights activist, Alice Paul, led the campaign that resulted in the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Born in Mount Laurel and died in Moorestown, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1979. A name that is strong and sweet, Alice is also popular, jumping from Number 258 to Number127 this past year!

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channing-1

With parents looking to starlit surnames of the past like Harlow for name inspiration, why not consider those of current celebs? There’s a wide choice, from established first names like Damon (Matt) and Piper (Billie) and Vaughn (Vince) to undiscovered nature names such as Branch (Michelle), Crow (Sheryl) and Pike (Rosamund). Here are our nominees for best celeb surname possibilities.

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