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Category: British baby names

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Most Popular British Names by Letter, 2013

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British name popularity

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names Are Amelia and Alfie the most popular British A names? You would be forgiven for thinking so, but the answer depends on where you live. Scots would say it’s Ava and Alexander, while Northern Ireland would quote Aoife and Adam. Though we are all held together by common trends, each part of the UK has its own regional favourites. Sophie, for example, holds sway as the most popular S girls’ name in most of Britain except Wales, where Seren is favourite. Northern Ireland likes Finn better than Finley, and Scotland prefers Brodie to Benjamin.

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Sibling Names: The latest from London

British sibling names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

We love combing the birth announcements in the London Telegraph for baby name trends and ideas.

Each time we issue a report, we look for a different focus — unusual names, fascinating middle name combinations — and today it’s sibling names.

While we hate to exclude singletons with such wonderful names as Aurelia Liliana Rosabel and Tiago Rafferty Redfern, the sibling names were even juicier.

Some observations: The newest vintage names being unpacked from mothballs in England are Martha and Herbert.  Some of the most charming combinations mix ethnicities (Emiko and Freddie) or match first letters (Orlando and Ophelia).  Out-of-the-box middle names include word names, place-names, and surnames such as Spark, Houston, and Allgood.

Oh, and, as usual, these British parents manage to find baby names that are distinctive and adventurous and gorgeous without resorting to (almost ever) strange inventions or kree8tiv spellings.

Our picks from the latest announcements:

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Baby Name Trendspotting: Hello, Dolly!

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name trendspotting

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names

Even though they didn’t make the top 20 list of names which had moved up the most in 2013, one thing I particularly noticed about the recent England and Wales data release was the number of “Dol” names that had shot onto the scene.

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posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
British baby names

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names

What names are quintessentially ‘British’?

I see this question a lot but it’s a hard one to pin down. Do we mean solely British in origin, or only British in use? When Prince George was born our media heralded it as a “quintessentially British” name — and why not? We’ve had numerous kings bear the name, and it’s even the name of the patron saint of England. But George was originally a Greek name, brought late into our Royalty by German Hanovarians. Ask many Americans and the first George they think of is Washington or Bush.

For me, the quintessentially British names are those which are very familiar to us as a nation, that have been or are currently popular, but are little used in America, Canada, Australia and other English-speaking countries. Names such as Nicola – our darling of the 70s – Darcy, Imogen, Poppy, Freya, Alfie, Jenson, Gareth, Alistair and Finlay.

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posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
British baby names

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names

It’s official! The number 1 names in 2013 for England and Wales were Amelia, for the third year running, and Oliver, last at #1 in 2010. Steep climbers Ava and Isla both made it to the Top 5 and Oscar and Poppy were in the Top 10 for the first time.

According to a study on baby name trends by the Office of National Statistics , the Prince George Effect on names has been so far overrated — though the names of royals Harry, William, and George all now rank in the Top 10 for boys.

Here is a list of the Top 30 names:

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