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UK vs US Popular Baby Names

posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
Anglo-American baby names

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names

Britain and America: two countries sharing, yet divided by, a common language.

As both a Brit and a name lover, the release of the US statistics is always fascinating for me.
On your top 10 are names of interest which are having a direct influence on British names. There are names which have had their day in the UK and are now swiftly declining, and, of course, there are names which are very similar in both countries.

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
royal princess possibilities

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More than Matilda

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are expecting their second child in April, and rumour has it that they are going to have a princess, rather than a prince (rumour also said that Prince George was going to be a girl, so don’t get too attached to the notion).

However, suppose Prince George did have a sister rather than a brother, what might her name be? I looked through the names of all those born in the House of Windsor to a monarch, or to an heir to the throne, and found that the names chosen for them tended to follow fairly clear patterns.

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Bloomsbury baby names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

There’s a new novel out that’s attracting quite a bit of attention titled Vanessa and Her Sister, the story of the Stephen sisters, Vanessa and Virginia—the latter far better known by her married name, Virginia Woolf. The two of them were key members of the influential literary circle known as The Bloomsbury Group.

Looking at the names of both the main members and the more ancillary ones in this creative coterie sometimes called the “Bloomsberries,” we find some appropriately distinctive, sometimes arcane, appellations. Beyond Vanessa and Virginia (who was born Adeline Virginia), here are the most interesting.

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international names

Names travel among cultures further and faster now than ever before.

In the US, rising stars include the Irish Maeve and Declan, the Spanish Mateo and the Arabic Imani.

The British like such French names as Sophie and Chloe, while in France there’s a craze for British names such as Emma and Tom.  And then there are those names used throughout Europe that are gaining some attention in the US: Cosima, Leonie, Roman.

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British baby names

The Top 100 names of England and Wales are resplendent with choices that feel a lot more chic and surprising in the US than they must in the UK.

Freya, for instance, the Norse goddess name that’s become a Top 20 staple on the other side of the pond, just cracked the US Top 1000.  Florence, which has been stylish in the UK for decades now and still stands at Number 29, fell off the US Top 1000 in 1982 and has yet to reappear.  Harriet is Number 61 in the UK while it hasn’t been on the US Top 1000 since the 1970s, while Martha stands at Number 73 in the UK and rising yet is at 803 and sinking in the US.

The boys’ Top 100 in the UK includes names such as Arthur, Freddie and Frederick, Louis, and Stanley that rank much lower in the US.

Below the UK Top 100, it’s impossible to quantify baby name trends as statistics don’t exist.  Instead, we must rely on anecdotal evidence: What fashionable young parents in Shoreditch and Swansea are naming their babies, compared with names considered stylish in Soho (the New York one) and Silver Lake.  While there are some similarities — fashionable parents on both sides of the pond love Iris and Oscar, Ada and Arthur — there are many fascinating differences in taste.

Our prime examples of names that are more stylish on the UK side of the pond than the US:

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