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Category: boys’ names 2011

Cool Baby Names: The -Er Names

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See all our lists of cool baby names here.

Cool baby names often share a certain something: an initial (like O), an origin (like Irish), or a sound — like -er at the end.

Blame it on Jennifer and Christopher. What those two mega-popular names have in common is their unusual –er ending, which launched a name sound that holds a lot of appeal to the contemporary ear.

Dozens of the cool baby names for boys today share the –er ending, along with a handful of choices for girls. Some of these are traditional first names but more are surname-names and occupational names.

Of course, Jennifer and Christopher were not the only popular names or even the first to feature –er at their end. Long-used –er names include Peter and Alexander, other trendy 1980s choices are Amber and Heather, and widely-used popular names that end in –er include such divergent choices as Oliver and Winter, Skyler and Spencer, River and Ryker, Harper and Hunter.

And then, as happens with name trends, there are dozens of choices that are more unusual and more stylish. Among the most appealing are the traditional boys’ names that share the –er ending:

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Click here for the new list of most popular names.

What choices do we see leading the way for baby names 2011? Here, we look at some of the most popular categories for parents and pick out the specific names we predict we’ll be hearing much more of this year and in the decade ahead, based on nameberry statistics.

Biblical Names 2011

Biblical names have been popular for several decades now, which means parents are forging into new territory in search of biblical names that haven’t been overused.

Girls: Delilah, Jemima, Magdalene, Ruth, Susanna
Boys: Abel, Asher, Eli, Gideon, Levi

Celebrity Names 2011

The hottest celebrity names are either the names of newly-hot celebrities such as Isla Fisher; the fresh-sounding names of new celebrity babies, such as Flynn; new ways to use the names of megapopular celebrities, such as Anniston for Jennifer; or rediscovered names of celebrities such as Isadora Duncan.

Girls: Anniston, Evangeline, Isadora, Isla, Seraphina
Boys: Arlo, Dexter, Flynn, Penn, Rufus

Hero Names 2011

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Want the hottest baby name trends for 2012? Check out our baby names 2012 story.

Baby names 2011 signal a new lighter feel in the air and more optimistic outlook for our offspring.   Here, our predictions for the top trends for baby names 2011.

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Baby Names 2010: Top 100 For Boys

2010 Top Names

Our focus on baby names 2010 continues today with the top 100 boys’ names.

The top seven names remain the same from the first quarter count, with Henry, Finn, and Oliver weighing in at numbers 1, 2, and 3.  This greater stability on the boys’ side echoes the pattern in the overall U.S. popularity list, where boys’ names tend to maintain their places longer than girls’ names.

The fastest riser is Sawyer, with Declan, Simon, Micah, Graham, and Landon also making big leaps.  William also landed much higher on the list — but we suspect that’s our mistake and we missed it last time.  Names that slid the furthest are Kyle, and Caleb.

New to the Top 100 from the first quarter (and marked with an asterisk*) are Satchel, Nico, Nicholas, Xavier (number 101 in the last count), Micah, Graham, and Landon.  No-shows: Hugh, Griffin, and Liev. Also no longer among the top boys’ names are three that may have landed on the list last time around because we mistakenly included searches for the girls’ versions: Harper, Remy, and Rory.

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For a long time, as girls marched in masculine naming territory, appropriating such boys’ names as Blair and Blake, Avery and Riley, Peyton and Parker, the boys retreated to firmly male turf, reviving such classics as William and Henry, forging into new macho terrain with names like Hunter and Stone.

It was okay, the thinking went with names as with clothing, toys, and career aspirations, for girls to adopt masculine attributes, but not for boys to take up girlish things.

Now, though, something surprising has happened. Boys’ names are getting decidedly softer, with traditional choices that include sibilant sounds and vowel endings gaining in popularity, and parents reclaiming unisex names for their sons.

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