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Category: biblical baby names

posted by: rebekah83 View all posts by this author
Job Marcellus Re-Sized

By Rebekah Anderson

Our son’s name is Job. No, not “job,” as in a vocation. It is pronounced with a long “o,” and rhymes with robe. As in, the book of Job in the Bible, the story about a man who is visited with overwhelming trials. Yeah—that Job.

My husband and I decided on the name because we loved Job’s faithfulness. We loved the sound of the name’s short, classic strength, and the cutesy but cool nickname “Joby” was quite appealing.

We started receiving pushback almost immediately. It started with friends and family. We both come from Christian homes, so the name Job is familiar to many in our circle. We were somewhat entertained by the emotional reactions; it was suggested that if we were to name our baby after someone who experienced so many trials, well, perhaps we were setting our kid up for hard times. And besides, the official meaning of Job is “persecuted” or “afflicted.” Surely we wouldn’t want to give our son a name with such a meaning!

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chris13-nicholas

There are certain names, like Merry and Christmas and Noel/Noelle, that scream to the world. “I’m a Yuletide baby!” One way around this, if you still want to acknowledge the season, is to pick names that are related but are also used all year round, to the extent that they’re found in the Top 500, given to babies born in July as well as December. Here are some examples—both religious and secular — that do relate to the holiday, but in a quieter voice, shown in the order of their current popularity:

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posted by: auroradawn View all posts by this author
auroraxx

By Aurora Firth aka auroradawn

Do you want to name your baby from the Bible but are put off by the popularity of Jacob or Abigail? Are you looking for a great name that no one else is using? Consider these 22 obscure yet usable choices. I eliminated a few favorites, such as the jubilant Jubal, in favor of names more likely to be new to many Berries.

Some things I learned: brothers Huz & Buz and Muppim & Huppim (not kidding!) testify that matchy sibsets are nothing new. Many Hebrew names, especially ones ending in -iah (signifying Jehovah), were unisex. It’s difficult to ascertain the meaning of many names, partly due to homophony (see the recent post.)

I hope you enjoy the list as much as I enjoyed compiling it!

BOYS:

Ashbel – this name, which comes with cool nickname Ash, belonged to a son of Benjamin.  Ashbel Smith was an American medical student befriended by James Fenimore Cooper when they were in Paris in the 1830’s.

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Biblical Baby Names: Why Noah now?

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It seems that just about every few decades since the 1940’s, one Old Testament patriarch name has entered the popularity list’s Top 5, some lingering longer than others.  From the forties through the early eighties it was David,  joined by Joshua in 1983, Daniel for the single year 1985, Jacob ten years later– and holding first place for the past thirteen years– and Ethan (a more minor biblical figure) in 2002.

And now we have Noah, which entered the golden circle last year at Number 5.

Noah fits right into this group—like the earlier Joseph, and David, Jacob and Ethan, it’s a simple, modern-sounding  two-syllable name with a strong first syllable and softer second.  And like Joseph, David, Daniel, Joshua and Jacob, Noah comes with a dramatic narrative that’s well known to most children.

As every Sunday school alumnus knows, Noah was deemed the only righteous man of his time, singled out by God to survive the great flood sent to punish an evil world, and instructed to build an ark to save his family and all species of animals from the flood.

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Four-Syllable Names: A whole lotta name

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Maybe it has something to do with Harry Potter attuning our ears to long Latinate names like Bartemius and Xenophilius—after that, suddenly the four syllables of Tiberius and Cornelius or Persephone no longer seem too weighty for a modern little babe.

After all, Isabella is the Number 2 girl’s name– and other four-syllable names like Penelope, Amelia, Cecilia, Seraphina and Valentina are standing right in line to join her. So clearly, many parents today are looking for just such substantial names, just as others are seeking them out to balance a short, brisk surname.

Here are our Nameberry Picks of the 20 + freshest four-syllable choices on the table. (But do note that variations in pronunciation and/or speedy speech can sometimes elide four syllables into three.)

GIRLS

Araminta—a delicate and lovely name long used in England and just now making a limited debut in the US. Refreshing nicknames: Minta and Minty.

Calliope—an upbeat, energetic name combining an ancient Greek heritage—Calliope is the mythological muse of epic poetry–with the cheerful musical sound of the carousel instrument.

Dorothea and Theodora are reverse mirror images of each other, both meaning ‘gift of God’ and both newly stylish, both more feminine versions of  rising three-syllable names—Dorothy and Theodore.

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