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Notable Names of May

notable names of may

By Meagan at tulipbyanyname

Spring has officially sprung! May is the peak of springtime in the Northern Hemisphere. With April showers now behind us, it’s time for fresh May baby names ready to bloom!

Maia / Maya – The month of May was named after Maia, a Greek and Roman goddess of spring; Maia is a Greek name meaning mother. The Roman’s considered Maia to be an incarnation of Mother Earth. Maia and Maya have the same sound, but differ in popularity and meaning. Maia was #639 in 2013 and Maya, a Hebrew name meaning water, was #72. Both Maia and Maya are great names for a baby born in May.

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The Royal Baby Name Update

royal baby name

The due date of the next British royal baby has now been semi-officially announced as April 25, so we are definitely in the home stretch of the name guessing games. Though overwhelming bets are on the baby being a girl, blue names have to be considered as well. Below are the dozen names considered favorites—though there are also some outliers like Frederick, Richard, Alexander and Alexandra lurking on the betting lists.

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
royal princess possibilities

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More than Matilda

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are expecting their second child in April, and rumour has it that they are going to have a princess, rather than a prince (rumour also said that Prince George was going to be a girl, so don’t get too attached to the notion).

However, suppose Prince George did have a sister rather than a brother, what might her name be? I looked through the names of all those born in the House of Windsor to a monarch, or to an heir to the throne, and found that the names chosen for them tended to follow fairly clear patterns.

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abby--infantas

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Here’s something I overheard recently:

Olivia’s a nice name, but Aria?  Who names a kid after Game of Thrones?

There’s something to that statement, isn’t there?  Olivia feels like a vintage revival, a literary choice thanks to Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, and a wildly popular name for over a decade.  Aria is a newcomer, a noun name that leapt from obscurity to prominence thanks to more than one pop culture reference.  They’re very different names.

Yet on sound alone, Aria and Olivia are similar.  Reverse the histories – make Aria the Shakespearean choice and Olivia the twenty-first century television darling – and it is easy to imagine the statement reversed, too.  After all, five of the current US Top 20 girls’ names end with -ia.

Nouveau or traditional, popular or obscure, our favorite names tend to share sounds.

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abby2-16-14

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Not so long ago, globe-trotting was the exception.  Immigrants quickly adopted the language of their new homes, and we tended to marry and raise children with partners from similar religious and cultural backgrounds.

Now, in our globally-connected world, many families are faced with naming across cultures.  The high-profile parents in this week’s round-up can claim roots in Colombia, Cuba, France, Sweden, as well as the US, UK, and Australia.  The baby names they chose reflect this diversity.

Some names seem like an attempt to bridge several cultures, like the Monegasque arrival.  Others, like one of Michael Jordan’s new daughters, or Melissa George’s son, seem to celebrate one parent’s roots.

The trend isn’t just limited to celebrities and royals.  Plenty of us are trying to solve naming riddles: combining Irish roots with Polynesian heritage, or finding Japanese names that work well in English.

If we’re all the jet-set, is it any wonder that our children’s names are so rich with influences from French and Spanish, from history recent and far past?  There’s a healthy splash of creativity and daring, too, which seems fitting in a world filled with so much possibility

On to the nine most newsworthy baby names this week:

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