Names Searched Right Now:

Category: baby name Rosie

oscars

By Linda Rosenkrantz

A couple of weeks ago we covered the Golden Globe nominee names, and now, as predicted and promised, we have a wider field to pick from with the new Oscar nominations, which include a wide range of behind-the-scenes people.  Not surprisingly, as a reflection of the gender imbalance in the industry, there are a lot more boys’ than girls’ names.

So here are some of the best names that were not included on the Golden Globes slate, with several interesting international choices in the mix.

GIRLS

Adruitha –(Adruitha Lee, Makeup and Hairstyling, Dallas Buyers Club) A completely unique name—Adruitha Lee is reputedly the only Adruitha listed in any U.S. phone book.

Celestine—(French Animated Feature title, Ernest and Celestine) In this charming French animated film, Celestine is a mouse—but one who is an artist and a dreamer. Celestine is a pretty, crystalline diminutive of Celeste, commonly heard on its native soil.

Read More

roses2

With Rose beginning to wilt from overexposure as a middle name, this might be a good time to look at other roseate options—including the somewhat neglected Rose-as-a-first name itself.  Several of these names have Germanic roots that have nothing to do with the flower, but they all now project the floral scent of the rose.

RoseRose, the fragrant symbol of England and matriarch of this family, predates the other flower names that emerged at the end of the nineteenth century; it was a Top 30 name from 1880 through 1932, when more elaborate and exotic forms of the name came into the picture.  It still ranks quietly at Number 337, just about where it’s been for decades.  Appearing in vehicles ranging from Titanic to The Golden Girls to Harry Potter, to a million old songs, its image has been rejuvenated by younger recent bearers like Rose Byrne and Rose McGowan.

Rosa—The soft and lovely Rosa, an upscale British favorite, as well as a Spanish and Italian standard, was a Top 60 name in the US at the turn of the last century.  The written form of Rose in old Latin documents, Rosa has been used as a name from the beginning of the nineteenth century. Notable namesakes include French painter Rosa Bonheur and Civil Rights activist Rosa Parks; Rosa Dartle is a character in David Copperfield. The change of the final vowel gives it a lot more substance and flow than Rose.

Rosabella is a smoosh name formed in the nineteenth century to mean beautiful rose, and it could become a new member of the Bella bunch. Others are Rosalba, meaning white rose, and Rosellawhich is also the name of a colorful parrot.

Read More