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Category: baby name Quinn

celebrity baby names

From the silent days when Jackie Coogan was palling up with Charlie Chaplin in The Kid and The Little Rascals were playing their pranks, cute kids have taken up a lot of screen time—some, like Shirley Temple becoming huge superstars—and also, in her case, influencing baby naming.  Here are 14 of the most namesake-worthy examples, from then till now—the ones with the most notable names.

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posted by: tararyaz View all posts by this author
olympibboy

By Tara Ryazansky

The men hoping to compete for the US Olympic Team have names that are just as winning as the women.’s  I put together a list of some boy names that might win over new parents in 2014.

LeifAs in Biathlon team member, Leif Nordgren.  This name has a strong Scandinavian vibe, but feels usable here in the US because of its well known connections to Leif Erikson and Leif Garrett.  I think it’s a great choice, but I must admit, I am guilty of the mispronunciation “Leaf“.  Its authentic pronunciation is more like “Layf”.

Stokes- Stokes Aitken of the US bobsled skeleton federation has a compelling name.  This very unusual choice could be inspired by any of the counties and towns across America called Stokes.  It is a fairly common English surname with variants that date back to the Middle Ages.

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Unisex Names 2013: The top 20 (so far)

silhouettemulti

By Pamela Redmond Satran

Rowan has taken over from Quinn as the most popular unisex name on Nameberry.

Rowan attracted the most views of all the unisex names on the site, defined as names given to at least 10% of the minority gender. Rowan, a Scottish and Irish name meaning “little redhead,” is more evenly unisex than Quinn, ranking 455 for girls and 301 for boys on the U.S. popularity list.

The other big news on our unisex list is the appearance of North, thanks to little North West, daughter of Kim Kardashian and Kanye West. While North was used for only 12 boys and fewer than five girls according to the official U.S. tallies for 2012, the current interest is almost entirely as a girls’ name.

The unisex names ranking highest in the 14 million views of our name pages in the first nine months of the year are:

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unisex names

Unisex names most popular among Nameberry’s visitors include those that lean girlward and those more favored for boys.  To qualify as a unisex name for this list, a name needs to be given to at least 10 percent of the minority gender.

Check out the graphic on our new Unisex Names home page to get more specific statistics on how these names divide along gender lines.  Our Number 1 unisex name Quinn, for instance, is now 68 percent female, a dramatic swing toward the girls’ side thanks to its starring role on television’s Glee.  Number 2 Rowan, meanwhile, is 63 percent male.

Names such as Sawyer and Kai are predominantly male, edging toward our 90% cutoff, while choices such as Avery and Emery are more than 80% female.

This is a fascinating list, including names such as Charlie and Elliot that were long traditional male names and other choices such as Reese (Witherspoon) and Peyton (Manning) that are heavily identified with celebrities of one gender but are still used for babies of the other.

If you’re interested in these or other unisex names for your baby, be sure to check the gender progression over time on the chart on our Unisex Names page.

The Top 20 Unisex Names so far this year on Nameberry are:

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abby-3-18

For the Nameberry 9 this week, Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain finds a group of sweet spot baby names--names that sound modern and new, but are still based in tradition.

After last week’s birth announcement for Rainbow Aurora, I thought it might be a quiet week.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

Baby names trends are constantly evolving, but I’m struck by a theme in this week’s baby name news. It’s the continuing rise of Modern Choices with Roots. This week’s appellations weren’t as out there as Rainbow, but they’re not all conventionally established names, either.

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