Category: baby name Henry


This week, Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel looks at the “quiet” classic baby names  and measures how they stand in the new popularity ratings. 

 There were dozens of stories in the baby name news last week, but they all shared a common theme: the Social Security Administration’s release of the 2012 baby name data

We talked about Titan and Briggs, Landry and Geraldine.  About how Jacob remained number one, but only if you didn’t tally up the many spellings of Aiden, Jackson, and Jayden.  Television’s influence was clear – Arya and Aria, Litzy, Major, and Jase.  Movies, sports, and music shaped our choices, too, as did faith.  Nevaeh’s little brother might just be called Messiah.

But what about the quiet classics, the names that rise and fall, but still appear in nearly every generation?  Hemlines change.  We graduated from the party line to the iPhone, the horse to the Prius.  And yet these names remain, worn by men and women, boys and girls of every age.

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Here they are–the newest berrybaby names from January, February and March–and they’re better than ever!

Every three months, when we prepare these quarterly reports, we’re knocked out by the endlessly creative variety of choices made (and I’m sure there are lots more that didn’t make it into the Birth Announcement Forum), the felicitous first and middle name combos and the great twin and other sibsets.

This time around there are reports of ten sets of twins:


Aria Violet and Harper Daisy

Lucille Violet and Coraline Hazel

Grace Vivian and Juliet Mae

Imogen Esteri and Phoebe Justine

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And now we come to the 2012 final quarter round-up of the names that Berries have actually chosen after all their various options were considered and discussed, on our forums and in the outside world.  And once again, it’s a gorgeous group, with many great first and middle combos and equally intriguing sibsets.

The most popular choices reported on the Birth Announcement forums between October 1st and December 31st were: Violet (3), Audrey (2), Beatrix (2), Eleanor (2), Eva (2), Matilda (2), Archer (2), Felix (2), Henry (2), and Jonah (2).

Tomorrow we’ll be taking a look at the whole year’s results—the most widely used first and middle names, as well as all the triplet and twin name choices.

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Why does Henry consistently rank as one of the top two Nameberry favorite boys’ names? (Finn is the other one.)

Because in many ways Henry is the most perfect of the classic boys’ names—as historic as James and John and William –yet with a quirkier edge that makes it seem modern, and even hip.

Henry has a lot going for it.  Let us count the ways:


At #67 on the Social Security list last year, Henry was given to a little over 6,000 boys across the country—as compared to almost 22,000 Jacobs.  Henry was much more commonly heard in the past, having been #10 in 1900, 12 in the 1910s, 18 in the twenties, 25 in the thirties, then dipping to a low of 146 in 1994, after which it started its edge back up.

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Movie Marquee Names: Eli, Ella and Evan


This week, Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel finds fresh inspiration from the title character names on recent movie marquees.

Want to see your baby’s name in lights?

There are a few ways to go about it.  There’s the Toddlers & Tiaras approach, courting fame with elaborate hair-dos and dance routines from an early age.  Or you could choose the name of a Hollywood legend – Ava or Marlon or Humphrey.

Here’s my new favorite:  head to the multiplex.  Right now Hanna and Arthur are on the marquee.  Even if you aren’t into movies about teenaged assassins or immature playboys, odds are that you’ll notice their names.  Many a stylish appellation has graced a movie poster.

Not every name catches on, of course.  It will take more than a singing chipmunk to revive Alvin, and Americans might love the boy wizard, but we’re not naming our sons Harry – yet. 

Looking back over the past few years, choosing a baby name from movie ticket stubs might be a winning proposition.






BettieGretchen Mol portrayed controversial pin-up girl Bettie Page in a 2005 biopic.




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