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Category: baby name Harry

Your Favorite Literary Names for Boys

harrypotter

Last week we asked you to nominate your favorite literary names for girls and were flooded with wonderful ideas, from the expected Matilda and Eloise to intriguing names such as Remedios (from 100 Years of Solitude) to Adah (of The Poisonwood Bible).

And now it’s the boys’ turn. What are your favorite boys’ names from books?

Obvious favorites include Huck Finn and Fitzwilliam Darcy, Harry Potter and Edward Cullen, Atticus Finch and Holden Caulfield . Here’s our full list of literary names for boys for more inspiration.

What great names, and great literary heroes, can you add to the list?

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Great Redheads with Great Names

redbloog

Looking for a name for a red-haired baby? The most common method is to go through the long list of names that mean, well, red-haired, from Rory to Rufus, Flynn to Flanagan. An alternative is to find yourself a worthy titian-tressed namesake, either from the pages of history or a current celeb. So, at the risk of offending by omission such ordinary-named notables as Helen of Troy, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, James Joyce, and Margaret Sanger—here are our nominations for best-named redheads of all time. Oh — and where is the most famous redhead of all? Turns out Lucille Ball’s natural hair color was mousey brown.

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abby 8-20

This week, Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel considers the subject of naming style as reflected in current newsy choices

Baby name style is a highly personal thing, and I’m always surprised by the names on birth announcements. Sure, I can guess with sometimes frightening accuracy what parents will have shortlisted for baby #2 or #3, but they’ve already showed their hand by then. Until they’ve hinted at what they’re thinking of for their firstborn, baby name style is surprisingly tough to guess.

Over the summer, I met three siblings, all living in the same area, each with a daughter about the same age. The three girls’ names could have easily belonged to sisters, even triplets: Annabelle, Georgia, and Phoebe. The women of the family clearly share the same general style – so much that I’d guess there must have been some consternation when they found out they were all expecting daughters within the same year.

For every situation where two former roommates both want to use Ethan James for their sons, there are plenty of cases where, no matter how much sisters or friends have in common, name style is simply not one of them. You roll your eyes when your BFF suggests Kestrel, only to hear your sis describe Eleanor as too old-fashioned.

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henry5

Why does Henry consistently rank as one of the top two Nameberry favorite boys’ names? (Finn is the other one.)

Because in many ways Henry is the most perfect of the classic boys’ names—as historic as James and John and William –yet with a quirkier edge that makes it seem modern, and even hip.

Henry has a lot going for it.  Let us count the ways:

HENRY IS POPULAR, WELL-LIKED, BUT NOT EPIDEMICALLY TRENDY.

At #67 on the Social Security list last year, Henry was given to a little over 6,000 boys across the country—as compared to almost 22,000 Jacobs.  Henry was much more commonly heard in the past, having been #10 in 1900, 12 in the 1910s, 18 in the twenties, 25 in the thirties, then dipping to a low of 146 in 1994, after which it started its edge back up.

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henry

When Henry was chosen as the #1 favorite boy’s name on the collective 5-star lists of the nameberry community, I was somewhat surprised and yet somewhat not.  Because in many ways Henry is the perfect boy’s name—as classic and historic as James and John and William –yet with a quirkier edge that makes it seem modern, and even hip.

Henry has a lot going for it.  Let us count the ways:

HENRY IS POPULAR, WELL-LIKED, BUT NOT EPIDEMICALLY TRENDY.

At #78 on the Social Security list last year, Henry was given to fewer than 4,000 boys across the country.  It was much more commonly heard in the past, having been #10 in 1900, 12 in the 1910s, 18 in the twenties, 25 in the thirties, then dipping to a low of 146 in 1994, after which it started its edge back up.

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