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Category: baby name Hank

new years

If you’re shopping for a New Year’s baby name, there are several routes you could take. You might choose January, à la Ms. Jones or Eve à la New Year’s. Or you could pick a name whose meaning celebrates the hope brought by a new year, like Nadia or Esperanza—or Hope. Or one that suggests the dawn of a new year, such as Aurora or Oriana—or Dawn. But you could also go down the namesake path, paying tribute to a notable bearer of a name who entered the world on New Year’s Eve or Day.  Here, eleven worth namesakes born on December 31 or January 1.

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henry5

Why does Henry consistently rank as one of the top two Nameberry favorite boys’ names? (Finn is the other one.)

Because in many ways Henry is the most perfect of the classic boys’ names—as historic as James and John and William –yet with a quirkier edge that makes it seem modern, and even hip.

Henry has a lot going for it.  Let us count the ways:

HENRY IS POPULAR, WELL-LIKED, BUT NOT EPIDEMICALLY TRENDY.

At #67 on the Social Security list last year, Henry was given to a little over 6,000 boys across the country—as compared to almost 22,000 Jacobs.  Henry was much more commonly heard in the past, having been #10 in 1900, 12 in the 1910s, 18 in the twenties, 25 in the thirties, then dipping to a low of 146 in 1994, after which it started its edge back up.

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henry

When Henry was chosen as the #1 favorite boy’s name on the collective 5-star lists of the nameberry community, I was somewhat surprised and yet somewhat not.  Because in many ways Henry is the perfect boy’s name—as classic and historic as James and John and William –yet with a quirkier edge that makes it seem modern, and even hip.

Henry has a lot going for it.  Let us count the ways:

HENRY IS POPULAR, WELL-LIKED, BUT NOT EPIDEMICALLY TRENDY.

At #78 on the Social Security list last year, Henry was given to fewer than 4,000 boys across the country.  It was much more commonly heard in the past, having been #10 in 1900, 12 in the 1910s, 18 in the twenties, 25 in the thirties, then dipping to a low of 146 in 1994, after which it started its edge back up.

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