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Category: baby name games

girl-boy

One thing we’re finding really mesmerizing about our gorgeous new Top 1000 U.S. names page is how easy it is to read across each line and compare the names of each gender that have the same rank.  Some of the pairs seems perfectly matched — Sarah and Henry at Number 43, for instance, or Cadence and Skyler at Number 290 — whereas other equally-ranked pairs feel discordant.

We can’t help thinking, as we survey the list, which pair we’d pick if we had a baby girl and a baby boy and had to choose their names from the same line.

Annabella and Lorenzo sound pretty great together, we think.   Or maybe Lilah and Beau, or Camilla and Zachariah.

But we’re really more interested in finding out which pair you’d pick, if you had to choose names for your only daughter and only son from the same popularity rank?  And why?  Do you really like both names equally, or do you simply think they make the most balanced set?

Here’s the link again to the new Top 1000 page: http://nameberry.com/search/popular_names

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Name the All-Boy Quints!

boyquints

All-boy quintuplets are very rare, so naming them is one of those name nerd fantasies that is unlikely ever to come true.

But we can dream, can’t we?

Over in our forums, there are nearly 500 pages of responses to the name game challenge to name a set of all-boy quints.

For further inspiration, here’s a list of all quintuplets born in the world, at least as of last year. An all-boy set in Pennsylvania has the excellent names of Ian, Wesley, Sawyer, Micah and Travis. Alabama‘s Guttensohn quints, pictured here, are named the compatible Hunter, Parker, Tanner, Taylor, and Mason.

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nvh-name-game-illustration-cropped-623x389

When we started Nameberry, way back in ’08, we’d never heard of Baby Name Games.  Yes, we’d played them, but only privately, by ourselves, and only then before adolescence.  We didn’t realize that the whole idea of name games had become institutionalized and that they were played in broad daylight (or at least, computer light) by name lovers all over the internet.

And then we launched Nameberry, and some of the first visitors to the site asked us to add Baby Name Games to the forums.  Once we did, we were amazed by the variety and energy of the offerings.  There are nearly 1500 threads on the Name Game boards now, some of them running to thousands of individual posts.

With those kind of statistics to live up to, it might be difficult to create the World’s Biggest Name Game here.  But we’re going to try.

Here’s the idea.  It’s pretty simple, and takes off from our trademark construct, “If you like x, you might love y.”

We’ll go first, suggest a name you might like, then a substitute you might love instead.  Then you take our substitute name for your “like,” and suggest a new alternative for that name.  And so on.

For example, we say, “If you like Lee, you might love Liam.”  Then you say, “If you like Liam, you might love Levi.”  And then the next person says, “If you like Levi, you might love Denim,” and the next person starts with Denim, and onward.

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Nameberry Faves? Do tell!

berryheart

Today’s multi-part question of the week is all about us—we’re asking you what you like best about Nameberry. 

Answer any or all:

What has been your all-time favorite blog—and/or what kinds of blogs do you like best?  Such as:

   **The crowd-sourced, interactive Questions of the Week, like this one

   **Trends and predictions

   **Names from different cultures

   **Name history

   **Personal guest blogger stories

   **Names from literature, art, pop culture

   **Seasonal and holiday blogs

   **Others?

Do you have a favorite list?

What’s your favorite forum?

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Confessions of a Name Nerd

Name Game

For years, it was my dirty little secret. I had special paper: lined white pads with no margins or holes down the left side. The pens had to be just so too, heavy black or blue fountain pens like we used in Catholic school. I needed two decks of cards, shuffled together. And my name lists, that was the most important thing.

I called it Writing Names, and the only people who knew I did it, my parents and my younger brother, teased me mercilessly about it. It was weird, they said, crazy even. And so I kept it secret from the rest of the world, not only when I was ten and eleven and twelve but for years afterward.

I was seriously unpopular during that time, too old to race around on bikes or play house in the woods, but too young to be so ashamed of my name obsession that I’d give it up. After school and through long summer days, I’d get out my paper and my cards and my lists and I’d settle in for hours alone with my Name Game.

Here’s how it worked: I had four lists of 144 names each – girls’ names, boys’ names, last names, and place names. The names on the lists were each keyed to a pair of cards: ace-two might equal Barbara, say, or eight-three Joseph. I’d shuffle my cards, divide them into two equal piles, and then turn over the first pair, which would indicate the fathers’ name in the family I was inventing. Then mom and last name.

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