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Category: baby name blogs

Introducing the New Nameberry!

vision.georgia

We are thrilled to announce the new, redesigned, and much improved Nameberry, introducing a host of new features now and over the days and weeks to come.

Designed by the fabulous Tedworth & Oscar, aka the British brother team Joe and Jake Baggaley, the new Nameberry is completely responsive, created to look as beautiful and work as seamlessly on your iPhone as it does on your big-screen desktop.

Besides its new mobile capabilities, other changes you’ll notice on Nameberry right away:

– An updated, more sophisticated palette, expanding on our standard pink-and-blue with a range of pastels keyed to different functions.

A second blog on our home page where we’ll host wonderful guest baby name bloggers (like Eleanor Nickerson of British Baby Names, featured today) along with pregnancy and baby experts.

Expanded list pages, giving you a snippet of information on all the lists in a category or a bit about every name in the list.  Plus the option to view lists old-school, as just a complete array of linked names.

Simplified name ratings, letting you vote yay, nay, or meh for every name.

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Nameberry’s Most Popular Features of 2012

babybooks

Forget Katniss and Finn: Today we leave individual baby names behind and bring you the most popular features on Nameberry in 2012.

Sifting through nearly100 million page views on the site, these are our most-read blogs, our lists that attracted the highest number of viewers, our most commented-on forums, and the user lists that drew the most attention.

How many have you seen?

Top blogs

100 Best Cool Unusual Boys’ Names and Best Cool Unusual Girls’ Names

These 2010 blogs that detailed the best names given to 25 or fewer babies continue to rank highest on our site.  Our picks for boys include Amias, Barnabas, and Cashel; for girls, Fleur, Honora, and Verena.

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mistakehelgaweber

There are few things more thrilling in life than having your first baby.  But newbie baby namers are prone to making some mistakes that more experienced name choosers are able to avoid.

If you’re choosing a baby name for the first time, don’t make one of these 7 common mistakes:

1. Believing that the names that were popular – and creative – when you were a kid still have the same status.

Name tastes have changed radically over the last decade or two.  Goodbye, Jessica and Josh, hello Layla and Serenity, Landon and Tristan – all Top 100 names.

2. Thinking that the playground rules are the same as they were back in the day.

Kids no longer get teased for having names that are unique, androgynous, exotic, or hard to pronounce or spell.  Rather, name diversity is celebrated.

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macho

Boy names have undergone a radical shift over the past few decades, with the old stalwart names like James and Robert making room for a whole army of new choices that break the traditional masculine mold.

The trendiest boy names are not exactly feminine, or even androgynous, but are decidedly male names that nevertheless don’t hail from conventional masculine roots. We mean the two-syllable, surname-sounding names like Caden and Brody, Logan and Landon.

Many parents seem more willing than they might have been before to bestow upon their sons unisex names also well-used for girls: Peyton, Jordan, Taylor, Sasha.

Then there are the more traditional names, but with softer sounds — vowel endings, the sibilant s or sh — usually associated with girls’ names. The most popular of these include Joshua and Noah, Asher and Isaiah.

Another branch of the new baby boy names are macho names that also break ranks with traditional masculinity: Breaker and Ryker, Harley and Ace.

What we’re interested in is your view of masculinity as evidenced by these changing boys’ names.

Do you think the change in names is evidence of a deeper change in the way we think of boys, of masculinity, of what we want for our sons growing up?

How did your own views of masculinity play into the name you chose for your son, or a name you might pick in the future?

Would you give your son a name that was also used for girls — why or why not? Would you want a traditional boys’ name or look for one that broke the masculine mold — again, why and why not?

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gwendolyn-brooks

This year in celebration of Black History Month we turn for naming inspiration to the cultural heroines of the Harlem Renaissance.  These women—novelists, poets, playwrights, painters, sculptors and musicians– all played significant roles in the movement that flourished from the end of World War I through the mid-1930s, during which a group of writers and other artists fostered an intellectual blossoming that was instrumental in forging a new black cultural identity.

The talented women listed below, some better known than others, would all provide great namesakes and role models for any child.

A’LELIA Walker—an African-American businesswoman who was an important patron of the artists of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s.

ALICE Dunbar-Nelson — Journalist, poet, activist and prominent Harlem Renaissance figure.

ANGELINA Weld Grimké—Harlem Renaissance writer, one of the first black women to have a play performed in public.

ANITA Scott Coleman—Though born in Mexico and later a resident of the Southwest, Coleman published many short stories reflecting the themes of the Harlem Renaissance.

ARIEL Williams—a teacher, musician and published poet.

AUGUSTA Savage—a sculptor known for her bronze busts of Frederick Douglass, W. C. Handy, James Weldon Johnson and other prominent African Americans.

CLARISSA Scott Delaney—onetime secretary to Booker T. Washington, she was a poet whose subjects included Pan-Africanism and bi-racialism.

DOROTHY WestHarlem Renaissance novelist and short story writer, best known for her novel The Living is Easy, about an upscale black family. (shown at right)

EULALIE Spence—an actress, teacher and playwright during the Harlem Renaissance.

GEORGIA Douglas Johnson—a prolific poet and playwright whose Washington DC home was open to the leading black artists of the day, including Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen.

GWENDOLYN Brooks was the first African-American to win a Pulitzer Prize, for Poetry in 1950

HELENE Johnson—a Harlem Renaissance poet, cousin of Dorothy West; one of her innovative poems, ‘Bottled,’ appeared in the May 1927 Vanity Fair.

JESSIE Redmon Fauset—called by Langston Hughes a “mid-wife” of African-American literature, she was the literary editor of Crisis magazine and was the first black woman to be elected to Phi Beta Kappa.

LOIS Mailou Jones—a prize-winning artist who had a long and influential career, and whose work is represented in many major museums, including New York’s Metropolitan.

MARITA Bonner, whose writing dealt with issues of race, gender and class.

NELLA Larsen—a novelist who was the first African-American woman to win a Guggenheim fellowship for creative writing.

REGINA Anderson, New York City librarian who was one of three women to establish a salon for artists and intellectuals; helped found the Negro Experimental Theatre

ZORA Neale Hurston—one of the best known figures of the movement—though she died in poverty—particularly recognized for her 1937 novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God.

Also considered part of the Harlem Renaissance were such entertainers as:

BESSIE Smith

BILLIE Holiday

ELLA Fitzgerald

ETHEL Waters

IVIE Anderson

JOSEPHINE Baker

LENA Horne

LIL Hardin Armstrong,

MAMIE Smith

MARIAN Anderson.

NINA Mae McKinney

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