Category: baby name Bellatrix

Magical Baby Names from Harry Potter

Harry Potter names

By Abby Sandel

Are you ready to go back to Hogwarts?

On July 31st, the eighth installment in the Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, will be released. A two-part stage play based on the story debuted in London’s West End earlier this summer.

Thanks to a successful #KeeptheSecrets campaign, there’s been little coverage of the new adventures for Harry, Hermione, and Ron, but we do know that all three characters return – along with many of our other favorites.

We’ll meet their children, too. The next generation was introduced briefly in Book Seven’s epilogue, so no spoilers here.

Instead, let’s look at – what else! – the Harry Potter baby names that have caught on (or not) in the nineteen years since we first met an eleven-year-old wizard named Harry Potter.

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Bad Girls with Good Names

bad girl names

Why is it that so many bad girls, from the biblical temptress to the modern Bond girl, usually have such pretty and beguiling names? Does that touch of evil give the name some added zing or does it taint it forever.…or does it have no effect at all? Here are some prime examples that span across that spectrum.

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
constellation perseus

By Anna Otto of Waltzing More Than Matilda

For those who find themselves enchanted by the magic of the night skies, here are names of stars and constellations which could be used as baby names. I’ve sorted them into male and female, but a few could be used on either gender.



In the constellation Serpens. Its name comes from the Arabic for “fat tail (of the sheep)”.


A constellation named after a beautiful princess from Greek mythology, who was chained to a rock as an offering to a sea monster. Her name is said to mean “to think as a man” in Greek, interpreted as meaning to be as intelligent or brave as a man.


In the constellation Orion, this is among the brightest stars in the night sky. It means “female warrior” in Latin, and is sometimes called The Amazon Star.


In the constellation Canes Venatici (“The Hunting Dogs”), which represents the dogs belonging to the nearby constellation, Boötes (“The Ploughman”). Astronomers thought it would be nice to give him two dogs, and one is called Chara, meaning “joy” in Greek – it sounds like Cara. The other dog-star is Asterion (“starry”).


A constellation whose name is Greek for “lyre”. The lyre belonged to Orpheus, a legendary musician, poet and prophet from Greek mythology.

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