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Category: baby name August



20 Best Scandinavian Celeb Names

PFT roll_henie_portrait

Scandinavian names have been slow to enter the American stockpot of names.  Maybe it’s because they’re not as romantic as the Italians, as genial as the Irish, as energetic as the Russians, or as instantly chic as the French.

But there are a lot of great, neglected Swedish, Norwegian and Danish names to be discovered, and those of internationally known Scandinavian celebrities have provided a pathway in.  Here are the names of some such notables, both past and present, which are both appealing and accessible– and definitely worth considering.

Astridthe prolific Swedish author Astrid Lindgren is best known as the creator of Pippi Longstocking.  Her royal Scandinavian name has been neglected here in favor of the more familiar Ingrid, but is just as attractive.

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Day Names: Which would you pick?


If you had to pick a day name — for a child, for yourself, for a favorite — which would it be?

We skipped our usual seasonal names blog this summer because we had so much else going on, but we did meet a baby named August, and another named Julia.  We’ve been having fun watching the Showtime series Episodes, which features a character named Morning.  And on another of our favorite shows, Louie, there was a (not very nice) little boy named Never.

Day names are an ancient tradition in many cultures, most notably African ones where many names are often drawn from the time of day, day of the week, or season that a child is born.  Early African-American slave roles contain many Anglicizations of such names, from Monday to Friday, Early to Afternoon, Christmas to Easter.

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Looking for an August name for an August baby?  There’s a small but select group, ranging from the august Augustus to the modern sounding Austin to nicknames Augie and Gus.

AUGUSTUS, the pater familias of the group, actually started out as an honorific rather than a name.  It was first applied to Octavius, the adopted son—actually a great-nephew– of Julius Caesar when he became the undisputed ruler of the Roman world. The Senate decreed him the title Augustus, corresponding to Majesty and meaning great, magnificent, venerable.  It was after him that the month was named.

Augustus then became the official designation of every Roman Emperor who followed, but was never used as a personal name until 1526, when it was given to Augustus of Saxony, at a time when German royalty was imitating everything Roman, from palaces to sculpture, dress and wigs—and impressive Roman names.

As August—pronounced ow-goost, the name spread through Germany and the neighboring countries, and to France as AUGUSTE.

Seen now as somewhat fusty (but really  no fustier than Atticus or Maximus), Augustus is now #797 on the Social Security list, having peaked in the early 1900s, but it could find favor with parents looking for a path to Gus, and/or who like venerable Latin names.  It has several literary namesakes, in books ranging from The Pickwick Papers and Martin Chuzzlewit to Lonesome Dove to How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Harry Potter.

AUGUSTA. Though Great-Aunt names like Amelia and Adeline are back, we still haven’t seen any signs of an Augusta revival, possibly because it’s not as euphonious as the others.

It also dates back to that ancient time when those Roman emperors were assuming the title Augustus upon their accession; Augusta became the honorific bestowed on their wives, daughters and other female relatives.  It was introduced to England in the 18th century by the German Princess Augusta, the future mother of King George III. Well used in the US in the 1920s, it’s rarely heard today—except in the guise of yet another Harry Potter character and the formidible Aunt Augusta in the P. G. Wodehouse  Jeeves stories.

AGUSTINA, the Spanish version, is very popular in South America—ranking #5 in Uruguay. It’s also spelled AGOSTINA.

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What To Name Your Summer Baby

summer baby names

Summer is one of the nicest times of year to have a baby, the warm weather and slow pace making it that much easier to relax into new motherhood (and, from your baby’s point of view, into life!)  Here, our annual round-up of names that summon the season:

SUMMER — As a seasonal name, Summer may not be your top choice.  It’s feeling a tad shopworn after coming close to cracking the Top 100 in 1977; it’s been above number 200 for the past fifteen years.  Autumn is more popular but Winter is cooler.

Summer also has three excellent months names that include several usable variations.  These are:

JUNEJUNE, the hip middle name du jour, was out of favor for many years but now is back in a big way.  The name, and the month, are derived from JUNO, the Roman goddess of marriage and finances (great role model!) whose name got a big boost from the teenage heroine of the eponymous film.  The related and obscure JUNIA is a New Testament name.  Male versions include the Spanish JUNOT, popularized by Pulitzer winning writer Junot Diaz, and JUNIUS, Latin for “born in June.”

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