Category: American baby names

12 Great Revolutionary Hero Names

July 4th Hero Names

As we celebrate Independence Day, a time not only of barbecues and burgers, flag-waving and fireworks, but also an occasion to look back at the history of the event and some of the (more interestingly named) heroes in the struggle of the US to gain independence from the mother country. So here, with apologies to our loyal Britberries, a dozen of the best Revolutionary names.

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The Reddest and Bluest Baby Names

popular baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

If you name your baby something traditional like Maya or Maximilian, you’re probably a Democrat, while a new-fangled choice such as Brylee or Braylen might peg you as a Republican.

Blue State parents may be more apt to vote liberal than their Red State counterparts, but their taste in baby names is far more conservative.

We analyzed which of the Top 500 names were used most often last year in Red States vs. Blue. Our findings: Red State baby names tend to defy convention in spelling, gender identity, and the very definition of a first name, while the Bluest Names toe the traditional line.

Every single one of the Top 25 Reddest Names for both genders lies outside the traditional lexicon of proper names. Red State favorites include first names adapted from surnames such as Number 1 Reddest Names Blakely for girls and Kason for boys, word names such as Haven for girls and Kash for boys, and diminutives such as Millie and Hattie used as full names. .

Parents in Blue States, on the other hand, choose relatively conventional first names for their babies. All of the Top 25 Bluest Names for girls are traditional female choices, ranging from Number 1 Francesca to Alexandra to Miriam. In the boys’ Top 25, the only name that diverges from the usual lexicon of first names is surname-name Finnegan.

The first traditional girls’ name in the Red State tally, by contrast, is Mary, all the way down at Number 51, with the first traditional boys’ name ranking even lower: Abram at Number 76.

Other markers of traditional naming in the list of Blue State favorites include girls’ names that are feminizations of male names, such as Gianna and Daniella, and Biblical and/or royal boys’ names, such as Leo, Nicholas, and Peter.

Red State parents are also much more likely to invent new spellings for baby names, with popular girls’ names including Kyleigh and Journee and four different spellings of Kason dominating the boys’ list. And the Reddest Names tend to push gender boundaries, with McKinley ranking in the Top 10 for girls and Lane in the Top 20 for boys.

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Baby Names Before 1850

vintage baby names

Records on baby names only started in the US in 1880, and so getting an accurate read on what babies were named before that has been difficult at best. But now a researcher named Douglas Galbi has compiled lists of baby names drawn from census records of the early 19th century. With the help of Esita Rocha, we combed through Galbi’s data on baby names from 1800 to 1850 in search of trends, patterns, and vintage baby names that go way beyond the expected John and Mary, Elizabeth and James. Here, our findings, illustrated by American folk art of the same period.   — Pamela Redmond Satran

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international names

Names travel among cultures further and faster now than ever before.

In the US, rising stars include the Irish Maeve and Declan, the Spanish Mateo and the Arabic Imani.

The British like such French names as Sophie and Chloe, while in France there’s a craze for British names such as Emma and Tom.  And then there are those names used throughout Europe that are gaining some attention in the US: Cosima, Leonie, Roman.

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posted by: upswingbabynames View all posts by this author
americano

By Angela Mastrodonato of upswingbabynames

Often an inspiration for artwork and music, classic Americana is an untapped resource for baby names rich in history and culture.

These names have American roots. These names have an American image, but (with some exceptions) most aren’t even popular in America. But they have styles appealing to many American parents.

Girls

America Admittedly this is not a surprising pick. What is surprising is how long America has been around as a given name. America first came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. The name first made the Social Security top 1000 list back in 1880, the earliest year for name rankings.

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