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Category: 2010 baby names

Isabella and Jacob Still #1

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Isabella and Jacob are still the top names in the U.S., according to the official statistics for 2010 released this morning by the Social Security Administration.

With a Top 10 list that was extraordinarily stable — Aiden was the only name that moved on, with Joshua falling off — most names even retained the rankings they held last year. The biggest change was Sophia, a name some berries thought would take first place this year, jumping up to Number 2.

The Top 10 for girls are:

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On the boys’ side of nameberry’s Most Popular Names 2010, Henry edged out Finn to hang onto the Number 1 place that it’s held for most of the year. If you count related names such as Finnian and Finnegan, however, the Finn family would be Number 1.

Oliver, the Number 1 boys’ name in England but only Number 98 on the U.S. list, is in third place on the nameberry count and Jasper and Milo are the fastest risers in the boys’ Top 10.

Nameberry’s Most Popular Names 2010 list counts the number of times visitors to our site searched each name throughout the year, which we like to think gives the discerning baby namer an excellent insight into which names are attracting the most buzz. Our individual name pages received 4.5 million views in 2010, with top name Henry garnering nearly 10,000 searches.  About two-thirds of our visitors are from the U.S., with another 20 percent from Canada, Australia, and the U.K.

None of our boys’ Top 10 are on the national Top 10. The fashionable classic James is Number 11 on our list but only 18 on the U.S. popularity list.

The fastest rising boys’ names are marked with an asterisk and include Sebastian, Sawyer, Declan, Silas, and Beckett.

Look here for our 2010 most popular names for girls.

Here are the Top 100 nameberry most popular names 2010 for boys:

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Charlotte is the Number 1 for girls among our most popular names 2010, cementing the lead that the royal feminine variation of Charles has held among visitors to our site all year.  Our number two and three girls’ names are Violet and Seraphina, both names of the daughters of Jennifer Garner and Ben Affleck, which has gone far to popularize them.

Four other names on the nameberry Top 10 for girls have risen steeply through our ranks: They are Eliza, Amelia, Adelaide, and Imogen.  Names beginning with vowels count for seven of the girls’ Top 10.

Nameberry’s 2010 most popular names list counts the number of times visitors to our site searched each name throughout the year, which we like to think gives the discerning baby namer an excellent insight into which names are attracting the most buzz.   Of the 4.5 million views our name pages gathered last year, more than 11,000 went to Charlotte alone, making it the most-searched name on the site for either gender.

None of the names in the girls’ Top 10 is among the U.S. ten most popular names.  Elizabeth comes the closest, 10 on the nameberry chart and 11 on the U.S. count.

Other girls’ names we see rising most over 2010 and predict will continue to be popular in 2011 are marked with an asterisk, and include Harper, Clementine, Aurora, Leila, and Genevieve.

Check out our 2010 most popular names for boys.

Following are the nameberry Top 100 2010 most popular names for girls.

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Baby Names 2010: The Also-Rans

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We’ve obviously been spending too much time in the depths of nameberry, checking out which names our visitors have been checking out.

And while Finn and Charlotte are the most-searched names for the first nine months of the year, and while we recently brought you our own nameberry Top 100 Baby Names 2010 for both boys and girls, we know some of you still want more.

What’s number 101, for instance?  Which names are flying below the official nameberry radar, not attracting enough views to make our 2010 most popular names lists, but still attracting thousands of views?

Here’s a selection.  This group does not include all the names right below the official Top 100, just those we found the most interesting.

There are lots of unusual and intriguing choices here, but for nameberry, that’s normal.

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African American baby playing with the letter A

A names – those that start with the letter A – have become the most widely used in the U.S., given to over 10 percent of all babies, more than double the proportion of children who were given A names in the 1950s.

You can peg the popularity of A names to pure fashion, and definitely, A names ranging from the classic Abigail and Alexander to the trendy Addison and Aiden have been on the rise for a couple of decades now.  While this may be part of an overall trend toward vowel names, which are up across the board while most consonant-starting names are trending down, A is up the highest.

But there’s evidence that A names may be beneficial for your child in more substantial ways.  A study by researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Diego found that students whose names begin with the letters A and B earn better grade point averages than those whose names start with C or D.  And more law school students named Anna and Andrew tend to go to top-ranked universities like Stanford than those called Chris and Drew.

Even more significant, another study suggests that people with A names live longer – in some cases, as much as a decade longer – than those whose names start with the letter D.   Scary, but compelling if you want to give your child every advantage in life.

A names account for  20 entries on the girls’ Top 100, up from only five (Ann, Anne, Anna, Anita, and Alice) in 1950.  They are, in order of rank with their standing in parentheses, for girls:

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