Names Searched Right Now:

Category: Trends and Predictions

Top Unisex Names 2013

unisex baby names

Rowan maintains the Number One spot, as it has all year, on our list of Most Popular Unisex Names 2013.

Quinn and Kai are second and third.  Our two new entrants to the Top 20 are the celebrity-inspired North along with Arden at Number 16.

We define unisex names as names given to less than 90 percent of either gender in the U.S.  We include the gender split taken from the most recent Social Security figures, which you can view in more detail on the chart on our Unisex Baby Names home page.

Our popularity lists are tabulated by ranking the unique page views each name attracts out of the over 20 million total views of our baby name pages in 2013.  Starting in 2014, we’ll be able to calculate the number of views of our names by gender and so will rank names considered unisex with the overall girls’ and boys’ popularity lists.

One trend evident from this list is the unusual predominance of names that start with the letter R, a trend unique to unisex names, with E-starting names in second place.  Remy is the name most evenly divided in use between the sexes, with Marlowe the choice used most often for girls and Kai leaning furthest toward the male side.

Our Top 20 Unisex Names for 2013 are:

Read More

Top 100 Boy Names of 2013

boypaperdoll

Asher is back on top!  The hot biblical name has reclaimed the crown as Number One boys’ name from Finn, which snatched it last year.

Declan, an Irish choice that flirted with the Number One spot on Nameberry throughout 2013, finished at Number Two.

Finn’s star may be flickering, but waiting in the wings is Finn‘s understudy Flynn, another Irish name that was brought to widespread notice by the young son of supermodel Miranda Kerr and actor Orlando Bloom.

Our popularity lists are tabulated by ranking the unique page views each name attracts out of the over 20 million total views of our baby name pages in 2013.

Boy name trends we extrapolate from our 2013 popularity list:

Read More

Our Top 100 Girl Names of 2013

baby girl names

There’s a new top girl in town, and her name is Imogen.

Imogen seized the crown from the Hunger Games-inspired Katniss as the Number One girls’ name on Nameberry for 2013.

Charlotte, which had been the most popular girls’ name in previous years, now stands at Number Two, while Harper, now officially classified as a girls’ name with over 90 percent of the baby Harpers female, is a new entrant to the list at Number Three.

Our popularity lists are tabulated by ranking the unique page views each name attracts out of the over 20 million total views of our baby name pages in 2013.

Major trends in girls’ names we see based on our 2013 Popularity List:

Read More

The Most Notable Names of 2013

2013notenames-george

The most notable names of 2013—a few of which were awaited with great anticipation– are borne by prominent personages in the realms of religion, royalty, politics, the tech world, and of course, entertainment. Here are our picks for the twelve names most emblematic of 2013—along with a few others that slipstreamed in their wake.

Read More

Contagious: What makes a name catch on?

contagious

By Jonah Berger, author of Contagious

In this year’s third-grade classes, teachers might have noticed an unusual number of Kaylas, Katies and Kyles. This follows an earlier bump for Alexes and Amandas, and other names that start with A. Why? One factor might be…the weather.

As part of our research on trends and how ideas catch on, my colleagues and I analyzed more than 125 years of data on the popularity of baby names.  We found that names that begin with K increased 9 percent after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. And names that start with A were 7 percent more common after Hurricane Andrew in 1992. It wasn’t that people named their babies after the storms. (In fact, fewer people named their children Katrina and Andrew after each respective hurricane.) Rather, it was similar sounding names that spiked after particular storms. Predicting cultural trends is of great interest to companies, consumers and cultural critics. Will a new song be a hit or a flop? Will turquoise be the new black? Will a particular public policy idea catch on or fizzle fast? There are big stakes — big rewards — in being able to accurately forecast cultural trends.

Read More