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Category: International Baby Names



Name Sage: A Baby Name for Two Cultures

Name Sage

Ruth writes:

My husband and I have decided not to find out the sex of our baby. We’re excited about the surprise, but are struggling to pick out both a boy and a girl name.

Our daughter is Leena Gray. We picked Leena because it is familiar to my husband’s Indian family but still accessible to mine, it has some global recognition, and it fit our criteria of being recognizable but not common.

Her middle was going to be Elizabeth (a family name), but a couple months before she was born we decided on Gray instead, after my dad Gary. I’m really glad we did, as I love the juxtaposition between the more traditional and unexpected names. I also really like the family connection. I was named after my great grandmother and have always appreciated having a story behind my name selection.

For the next baby, our criteria are the same, but we’re not necessarily committed to an Indian name.

Despite all that, my favorite right now for a girl is Violet (which my husband is not a fan of). His favorite is Ivy – I’m not sure where the botanical connection is coming from – which I like, but just doesn’t feel quite like “the name”. Perhaps with the right middle or as a middle? I’m also a fan of the Elizabeth nicknames Elsa and Elsie, but worried that they’re too popular after Frozen and that they’re too close to Leena.

For a boy, we’re completely lost. I have some interest in Ezra or Milo, but hubby’s not biting. I feel like it’s harder to find the sweet spot of relatable but not too popular boy names. Maybe this is where we need to dig in deeper to Indian names?

As far as middles for girls from my side, Elizabeth is a family name. My sister is Emily and my sister-in-law is Amelia, so I also like the idea of Amelie or Emilia or some sort of combination, and it’s a bit more unexpected, like Gray.

For boy middles, from my brothers we have Matthew, Michael, James, and John. Also my mom is Dana and has suggested that Daniel would be a great name for a boy.

We’d appreciate any advice you can give. I’m seriously ready to open the envelope to find out if it’s a girl or a boy just to narrow our choices!

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Eccentric British Baby Names

British baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Every few months, we love to peruse the birth announcements in the London Telegraph in search of new trends in British baby names.  The most recent listings included a bumper crop of unique, eccentric choices.  Does this mean that parents in England, like those in the US, are becoming more attracted to unusual names?  Though the British birth announcements still include plenty of expected names like Amelia and Beatrice, Henry and Alexander, we’re also seeing more distinctive, even edgy names.

In English style, this usually means names that have traditional roots and are not invented or drawn from places or things the way they might be in the US.  But we are also seeing more baby names drawn from far-flung cultures, cross-gender choices, and revivals of long-dormant names. In the middle, there are more surname names along with animal names such as Bunny and Bear.

Here, 50+ real baby names from the recent British birth announcements that evidence the new heightened taste for the unique….or is it just traditional English eccentricity?

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16 Arabic Names Ready to Import

arabic baby names

By Sophie Kihm

Arabic names haven’t “made it” yet in the United States. Despite millions of Arab-Americans, only three Arabic names are in the US Top 100 of 2014–Aaliyah, Layla, and Lila.

But by no means are Arabic names only reserved for people with this heritage. Many of us feel comfortable giving our children French names (even though we’re not French), English names (even though we’re not English), and Hebrew names (even though we’re not Jewish). The same should hold true with Arabic names.

There are plenty of beautiful, accessible options, so open your mind, and get ready to fall in love with some Arabic names!

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Hispanic Heritage Month Names

posted by: elizabethS View all posts by this author
Hispanic History Month

By Stephanie Bruce

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, a celebration which spans from September 15th to October 15th of all Hispanic/Latino peoples and the contributions they’ve made to the United States, I’ve put together a short list of some of the most influential Hispanic men and women who broke barriers and became inspirations to all.

While this list is far from exhaustive, it’s a solid start that may give you some inspirational and classic baby name ideas for your next child.

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
German boy names

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More Than Matilda

Anna recently recommended ten German girls’ names for importation, and now she’s done the same for the boys.

Latinised form of the Greek form of Andrew. The name has been used in Germany since the Middle Ages; a famous medieval namesake is Andreas Osiander, a Lutheran mystic and theologian. The name Andreas was used in Britain too, although probably the name was still pronounced the same way as Andrew in everyday life. Just outside the Top 100 in Germany, Andreas is less often seen in English-speaking countries, perhaps because of fears it will be be confused with its feminine counterpart, Andrea. This German classic seems like a fresh update to flagging Andrew, and has recently had some publicity from the disaster movie San Andreas.

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