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December babies

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Congratulations and welcome to all the beautifully named babyberries born in December, and thanks to their parents for posting and sharing their name stories.

More boys than girls this month and just one set of multiples, who carry on the family tradition of double first names (two of the more unusual names reported):

Penny-Lane Brenda and Priscilla-Lorraine Joy

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On the Lighter Side: Sibsets to Avoid

posted by: mill1020 View all posts by this author
bad sibsets

By Laura Miller Brennan

Have you ever met an awkwardly named pair of siblings? A brother-sister duo named Clyde and Bonnie—or worse–Harold and Maude?

It’s an inevitable part of naming your first child: some names for future siblings immediately become off-limits. Most of these are perfectly good on their own but combine with certain others for an unintentionally comic (or tragic) effect. Here’s a lighthearted look at some impressively bad sibling sets.

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What’s Your Hero Name Crush?

hero names

Hero names (and we include heroine names in that category) have been on the rise in recent years, with choices such as Harper and Hadley, Lincoln and Edison leaping up the popularity lists.

Hero names can take the form of a last name, as in Landry, surname of Dallas Cowboys coach Tom, used for both genders.  Hero names may also be distinctive first names such as Anais or Elvis that directly reference their more famous bearer.  Or they can be more ordinary names such as Georgia or Miles that provide a more subtle nod to the original.

What hero names are you crushing on right now?  Are you attracted to the hero first, the name first, or do you have to love both in equal measure?

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British baby names

The Top 100 names of England and Wales are resplendent with choices that feel a lot more chic and surprising in the US than they must in the UK.

Freya, for instance, the Norse goddess name that’s become a Top 20 staple on the other side of the pond, just cracked the US Top 1000.  Florence, which has been stylish in the UK for decades now and still stands at Number 29, fell off the US Top 1000 in 1982 and has yet to reappear.  Harriet is Number 61 in the UK while it hasn’t been on the US Top 1000 since the 1970s, while Martha stands at Number 73 in the UK and rising yet is at 803 and sinking in the US.

The boys’ Top 100 in the UK includes names such as Arthur, Freddie and Frederick, Louis, and Stanley that rank much lower in the US.

Below the UK Top 100, it’s impossible to quantify baby name trends as statistics don’t exist.  Instead, we must rely on anecdotal evidence: What fashionable young parents in Shoreditch and Swansea are naming their babies, compared with names considered stylish in Soho (the New York one) and Silver Lake.  While there are some similarities — fashionable parents on both sides of the pond love Iris and Oscar, Ada and Arthur — there are many fascinating differences in taste.

Our prime examples of names that are more stylish on the UK side of the pond than the US:

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occupational baby names

By Mark Edmond

What do August, Hannah, and Jules have in common?  It turns out that people with those names are more likely than others to be playwrights.

How about Casey, Vincent, and Roy?  They’re more apt to be plumbers.

At least that’s what our research at Verdant Labs shows.  While developing the Nametrix app, we analyzed public records to find the most inordinately common names in each profession.

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